Salsa

Salsa: One of the most popular Latin dances in the Singapore dance scene, it is easy to learn and a great way to make friends!  Salsa's hot spicy rhythm forces hips to sway and dance to the beat. You can find Salsa dancing in clubs and dance studios in every major city in the world and Salsa classes and dancing can be found every night in Singapore.

Salsa is a dance style associated with the salsa style of music now popular worldwide.  It's all about rhythm. For Cubans especially, music and dance has always had a very special place in society. Salsa music which is the "essential pulse of Latin music" is primarily played in Latin Dance Clubs. While not the easiest dance form, because of its fast tempo, it is not particularly difficult, and dancers of all skill levels should be able to gain proficiency within a matter of months. Salsa is usually danced with a partner and can be flirtatious in a fun way and sensuous in another. However, dancers may integrate solo breaks known as shines into their routines. Salsa shines involve lots of flamboyant movements and demonstrations of the body, and are intended as a way for a dancer to show off their full talent. While shines are in theory improvisational, there are many standard shines which dancers learn and can fall back on.

There are 3 different types of Salsa: the LA style Salsa On 1; New York style Salsa On 2 otherwise known as Mambo; and finally the Cuban style Salsa. All 3 types of Salsa have a pattern of six steps danced over eight counts of music. The LA and New York style Salsa are usually danced in a linear motion. Cuban Salsa on the other hand tends to go in a circular motion at all angles.

LA Style Salsa On 1
L.A. style is danced on 1 which literally means to dance on the first beat of the phrase, therefore gaining the name as "On 1". It is highly influenced by Hollywood showing many similarities with the lindy-hop, the swing and the hustle. In Salsa On 1, turns have become an important feature and also emphasizes theatricality and acrobatics.

New York Style Salsa On 2
Unlike LA style, New York style is danced on 2 which literally means to dance on the second beat of the phrase, hence taking on the name - "On 2". Many also refer to this style as "Mambo". On 2 timing emphasises the conga drum's tumbao pattern, and encourages the dancer to listen to percussive elements of the music.

Cuban Style Salsa
Cuban-style salsa can be danced either on the down beat ("a tiempo") or the upbeat ("a contratiempo"). Beats 1,3,5 and 7 are downbeats and 2,4,6 and 8 are upbeats. The Cuban Salsa is more commonly danced in groups of couples, with frequent exchanges of partner in which the style is that in many patterns, the leader and follower circle around each other and the patterns are synchronised by a caller. This form is also known as Rueda de Casino.

DID YOU KNOW?
Salsa means sauce in the Spanish Language, and carries connotations of the spiciness common in Latin and Caribbean cuisine. Salsa also suggests a "mixture" of ingredients, though this meaning is not found in most stories of the term's origin.

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Argentine Tango

Tango is a classic dance that is widely known in Singapore and around the world as a passionately romantic dance.  A fondly beloved dance in Singapore, Argentine Tango classes are popular amongst couples and singles to indulge in their emotional, elegant and passionate side.  Romantic and sophisticated; classy and sexy: Tango is a dance that has won over the hearts of generations time and time again. Join us in Actfa Dance School Singapore and discover this dance that is a national pride of Argentina!

“The music goes in my ears, is filtered through my heart, and comes out through my feet.” - El Flaco Dany Garcia

Tango has entranced dancers and audiences with its beauty, passion, drama and excitement. The pure joy of dancing tango is found at the milonga. A milonga refers to the event where tangos, milongas and waltzes are danced.  Tango as a music and a dance originated in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay and spread to the rest of the world soon after that.

Tango dance and tango music originated in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the area of the Rio de la Plata, and spread to the rest of the world soon after. Tango is a dance that has influences from Spanish and African culture.

Argentine Tango is danced in an embrace that can vary from very open, in which leader and follower connect at arms length, to very closed, in which the connection is chest-to-chest, or anywhere in between. The pure and very typical part of the argentine Tango is the very rich footwork and legwork. In tango, the steps are typically more gliding, but can vary widely in timing, speed, and character, and follow no single specific rhythm. Tango is essentially walking with a partner and the music. A good dancer is one who makes you see the music.

A tango is a living act in the moment as it happens and relies heavily on improvisation. One of the very interesting parts of the argentine Tango is, that men and women do not dance the same part as in a mirror. He can lead her in other elements, then he will dance himself and combines them to new combinations.

Early tango was known as tango criollo, or simply tango. Today, there are many tango dance styles, including Argentine Tango, Uruguayan Tango, Ballroom tango (American and International styles), Finnish tango and vintage tangos. What many consider to be the authentic tango is that closest to that originally danced in Argentina and Uruguay, though other types of tango have developed into mature dances in their own right.

History of Tango
The dance originated in lower-class districts of Buenos Aires. The music derived from the fusion of various forms of music from Europe. Jorge Luis Borges in "El idioma de los argentinos" writes:"Tango belongs to the Rio de la Plata and it is the son of Uruguayan "milonga" and grandson of the "habanera". The word Tango seems to have first been used in connection with the dance in the 1890s. Initially it was just one of the many dances, but it soon became popular throughout society, as theatres and street barrel organs spread it from the suburbs to the working-class slums, which were packed with hundreds of thousands of European immigrants.

In the early years of the twentieth century, dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires and Montevideo travelled to Europe, and the first European tango craze took place in Paris, soon followed by London, Berlin, and other capitals. Towards the end of 1913 it hit New York in the USA, and Finland. In the USA around 1911 the name "Tango" was often applied to dances in a 2/4 or 4/4 rhythm such as the one-step. The term was fashionable and did not indicate that tango steps would be used in the dance, although they might be. Tango music was sometimes played, but at a rather fast tempo. Instructors of the period would sometimes refer to this as a "North American Tango", versus the "Rio de la Plata Tango". By 1914 more authentic tango stylings were soon developed, along with some variations like Albert Newman's "Minuet" Tango.

In Argentina, the onset in 1929 of the Great Depression, and restrictions introduced after the overthrow of the Hipólito Yrigoyen government in 1930 caused Tango to decline. Its fortunes were reversed as tango again became widely fashionable and a matter of national pride under the government of Juan Perón. Tango declined again in the 1950s with economic depression and as the military dictatorships banned public gatherings, followed by the popularity of Rock and Roll. The dance lived on in smaller venues until its revival in 1983 following the opening in Paris of the show Tango Argentino created by Claudio Segovia & Hector Orezzoli. This show made a revolution worldwide, and people everywhere started taking tango lessons.

In 1990, dancers Miguel Angel Zotto and Milena Plebs founded the "Tango X 2" Company , generating novel spectacles and that a great current of young people incline for the dance of the tango, an unusual thing at the time. They created a style that recovered the traditional tango of the milongas, renewed it and placed it as central element in its creations, doing an archeological search of the diverse styles of the tango.

Many shows toured around the world, such as Broadway Musicals Tango Argentino & Forever Tango, Tango X 2, and Tango Pasion among others.

Tango styles
Tango consists of a variety of styles that developed in different regions and eras of Argentina and Uruguay as well as in other locations around the world. The dance developed in response to many cultural elements, such as the crowding of the venue and even the fashions in clothing. The styles are mostly danced in either open embrace, where lead and follow have space between their bodies, or close embrace, where the lead and follow connect either chest-to-chest (Argentine tango) or in the upper thigh, hip area (American and International tango).

Different styles of Tango are:
Tango Argentino
Tango Oriental (uruguayo)
Tango Canyengue
Tango Liso
Tango Salon
Tango Orillero
Tango Milonguero (Tango Apilado)
Tango Nuevo
Show Tango (also known as Fantasia)
Ballroom Tango
Finnish Tango
Filipino Tango

These are danced to several types of music:
Tango
Vals (the tango version of waltz)
Milonga (a related dance that usually has a faster tempo)
Tango Electronico
"Alternative Tango," i.e. non-tango music appropriated for use in the dance

The "milonguero" style is characterized by a very close embrace, small steps, and syncopated rhythmic footwork. It is based on the petitero or caquero style of the crowded downtown clubs of the '50s.

In contrast, the tango that originated in the family clubs of the suburban neighborhoods (Villa Urquiza/Devoto/Avellaneda etc.) emphasizes long elegant steps, and complex figures. In this case the embrace may be allowed to open briefly, to permit execution of the complicated footwork.

The complex figures of this style became the basis for a theatrical performance style of Tango seen in the touring stage shows. For stage purposes, the embrace is often very open, and the complex footwork is augmented with gymnastic lifts, kicks, and drops.
A newer style sometimes called "Tango Nuevo" has been popularized in recent years by a younger generation of dancers. The embrace is often quite open and very elastic, permitting the leader to lead a large variety of very complex figures. This style is often associated with those who enjoy dancing to jazz- and techno-tinged "alternative Tango" music, in addition to traditional Tango compositions.

Ballroom tango
Ballroom tango, divided in recent decades into the "International" (English) and "European" styles, has descended from the tango styles that developed when the tango first went abroad to Europe and North America. The dance was simplified, adapted to the preferences of conventional ballroom dancers, and incorporated into the repertoire used in International Ballroom dance competitions. English Tango was first codified in October 1922, when it was proposed that it should only be danced to modern tunes, ideally at 30 bars per minute (i.e. 120 beats per minute - assuming a 4/4 measure).

Subsequently the English Tango evolved mainly as a highly competitive dance, while the American Tango evolved as an unjudged social dance with an emphasis on leading and following skills. This has led to some principal distinctions in basic technique and style. Nevertheless there are quite a few competitions held in the American style, and of course mutual borrowing of technique and dance patterns happens all the time.

Ballroom tangos use different music and styling from Argentine tangos, with more staccato movements and the characteristic "head snaps". The head snaps are totally foreign to Argentine and Uruguayan tango, and were introduced in 1934 under the influence of a similar movement in the legs and feet of the Argentine tango, and the theatrical movements of the pasodoble. This style became very popular in Germany and was soon introduced to England, one of the first proponents being Mr Camp. The movements were very popular with spectators, but not with competition judges (Source: PJS Richardson, History of English Ballroom Dancing, Herbert Jenkins 1946, page 101-102)

Finnish tango
The tango spread from the dominant urban dance form to become hugely popular across Finland in the 50s after the wars. The melancholy tone of the music reflects the themes of Finnish folk poetry; Finnish tango is almost always in a minor key.
The tango is danced in very close full upper body contact in a wide and strong frame, and features smooth horizontal movements that are very strong and determined. Dancers are very low, allowing long steps without any up and down movement. Forward steps land heel first, and in backward steps dancers push from the heel. In basic steps, the passing leg moves quickly to rest for a moment close to the grounded leg.
Each year the Tangomarkkinat, or tango festival, draws over 100,000 tangophiles to the central Finnish town of Seinäjoki, which also hosts the Tango Museum.

Tango Nuevo
In the late 1990s a new style of tango dancing began appearing worldwide. Tango Nuevo dance style features an open embrace, fluid partner movements, trading of lead and further regional reinventions of the tango dance. Tango Nuevo is largely fueled by a fusion between tango music and electronica, though the style can be adapted to traditional tango and even non-tango songs. Gotan Project released their first tango fusion album in 2000, quickly following with La Revancha del Tango, released in 2001. Bajofondo Tango Club, a Rioplatense music band consisting of seven musicians from Argentina and Uruguay, released their first album in 2002. Tanghetto's album Emigrante (electrotango) appeared in 2003 and was nominated for a Latin Grammy in 2004. These and other electronic tango fusion songs bring an element of revitalization to the tango dance, serving to attract a younger group of dancers.

Filipino Tango
This is a very interesting and more free form style of tango. It seems to be a combination of hustle and American style tango. Lots of open breaks and turn as in hustle.

Technique comparison
Argentine, Uruguayan and Ballroom Tango use very different techniques and vocabularies, to the point where some consider them related in name only. In Argentine tango, the body's center moves first, then the feet reach to support it. In ballroom tango, the body is initially set in motion across the floor through the flexing of the lower joints (hip, knee, ankle) while the feet are delayed, then the feet move quickly to catch the body, resulting in snatching or striking action that reflects the staccato nature of this style's preferred music.
In Argentine tango, the steps are typically more gliding, but can vary widely in timing, speed, and character, and follow no single specific rhythm. Because the dance is led and followed at the level of individual steps, these variations can occur from one step to the next. This allows the dancers to vary the dance from moment to moment to match the music (which often has both legato and/or staccato elements) and their mood.

The Argentine Tango's frame, called an abrazo or "embrace," is not rigid, but flexibly adjusts to different steps, and may vary from being quite close, to offset in a "V" frame, to open. The American Ballroom Tango's frame is flexible too, but experienced dancers frequently dance in closed position: higher in the elbows, tone in the arms and constant connection through the body. When dancing socially with a beginners, however, it may be better to use a more open position because the close position is to intimate for them. In American Tango open position may result in open breaks, pivots, and turns which are quite foreign in Argentine tango and International (English) tango.

There is a closed position as in other types of ballroom dance, but it differs significantly between types of tango. In Argentine Tango, the "close embrace" involves continuous contact at the full upper body, but not the legs. In American Ballroom tango, the "close embrace" involves close contact in the pelvis or upper thighs, but not the upper body. Followers are instructed to thrust their hips forward, but pull their upper body away, and shyly look over their left shoulder when they are led into a "corte."

In Argentine tango open position, the legs may be intertwined and hooked together, in the style of Pulpo (the Octopus). In Puplpo's style, these hooks are not sharp, stacco ganchos, but smooth ganchos.

In Argentine Tango, the ball or toe of the foot may be placed first. Alternately, the dancer may take the floor with the entire foot in a cat-like manner. In the International style of Tango, "heel leads" (stepping first onto the heel, then the whole foot) are used for forward steps.
Ballroom tango steps stay close to the floor, while the Argentine Tango includes moves such as the boleo (allowing momentum to carry one's leg into the air) and gancho (hooking one's leg around one's partner's leg or body) in which the feet travel off the ground. Argentine Tango features other vocabulary foreign to ballroom, such as the parada (in which the leader puts his foot against the follower's foot), the arrastre (in which the leader appears to drag or be dragged by the follower's foot), and several kinds of sacada (in which the leader displaces the follower's leg by stepping into her space).

Finnish tango is closer to the Argentine than to Ballroom in its technique and vocabulary. Other regional variations are based on the Argentine style as well.

Related Classes: Ballroom Tango, Kizomba, Zouk, Bachata
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Salsa Styling

Go for a Salsa "facelift" here! This Salsa Styling dance class in Actfa Dance School Singapore teaches the ladies and men how to make their dancing more unique by incorporating various isolations, hand and foot work.  This class is meant for both ladies & men, to teach real-time application of body movements, hand styling, fancy footwork into their social dancing. 

Learn easy steps like Latin hand and leg pops, to more complicated ones like shoulder rolls, shimmies and bodywaves that are popular styling moves in the Singapore Salsa dance scene; learn how to pose smartly and with great confidence; learn how to charm him or her with simple, yet stunning moves on the dance floor.

This Latin dance class is meant for Salsa beginners who are new to body movement techniques, but also useful for seasoned dancers who want to touch up on their dance style. Throughout the course you will learn fundamental body isolations for Salsa, simple hand styling, easy to use footwork and body movements while dancing and also simple Salsa shines.

It's a fun class, filled with smiles, laughter and lots of character.  So what are you waiting for - learn how to stand out in the crowd; learn how to blow your dance partner away! 

Mondays 7.15 - 8.15pm
$225 for 13 classes. Call 6225 0150, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

PS: This class is focused on newbies to styling. If you are looking for advanced styling, try our Salsa Practica class or private classes.
PPS: You will benefit more from this class if you are also taking our Salcaa Body Isolation & Conditioning class also on Mondays at 8.15pm.

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Bachata

Learn the smoking, sizzling Bachata dance from Basic to Advanced classes in Actfa Dance School Singapore.  Bachata lessons are taught from open to close embrace, including the unique body isolations and footwork that defines Bachata as a much beloved dance. 

Bachata, a form of music and dance that originated in the countryside and the rural neighborhoods of the Dominican Republic. Its subjects are often romantic; especially prevalent are tales of heartbreak and sadness. In fact, the original term used to name the genre was amargue ("bitterness," or "bitter music"), until the rather ambiguous (and mood-neutral) term bachata became popular. It has been compared to the blues, although in modern times it bears similarities to R&B.

Bachata was created primarily by servants, who played it after their work days ended. They made the music out of ordinary objects like those commonly found in a backyard such as trash cans and fences. In some rural areas of the Dominican Republic, bachata means trash, but most citizens also agree that it means a party. Others say that bachata is derived from the Italian ballata, which was a popular form of music in Italy centuries ago.[citation needed] Bachata did not begin as the popular dance music that it is today and it was not acceptable among higher society. Guitar (either electric or acoustic) whose sound has been doctored with a flanger, reverb, echo, or a combination of the three, is featured. The use of arpeggiated chords as the basis for the melody is almost standard. An additional guitar, called the segunda (rhythm guitar), is usually mixed at a lower volume and provides syncopation. An electric bass guitar and güira help anchor the rhythm, with the güira sounding a bit like a high-hat (in pre 1990s bachata, maracas were played instead of güira). The use of the bongo drum further solidifies the basic beat and provides percussive accents in transition points; for instance right before a chorus.

Bachata is a popular guitar music from the Dominican Republic. Now successful among Latinos in the United States, bachata took shape over a period of about 40 years in the bars and brothels of Santo Domingo, not gaining acceptance in its native land until the late 1990s. Young groups like Bronx-based Aventura have a similar relationship to original bachata as rock and rollers do to the blues, which has languished in the shadow of its more commercially viable descendant. In fact, the parallel between bachata and the blues is marked. Although bachata developed out of, and bachateros play, a variety of different rhythms, notably including merengue, the music which is specifically called bachata is a variant of the bolero. The bolero in Latin culture has traditionally been a romantic music, dealing with themes like deception and lost love. The bachatero, like the bluesman, sings about pain and trouble; one difference, though, is that while the bluesman hops on a southbound freight and keeps moving, the bachatero gets as far as the neighborhood bar and looks for solace in a bottle of rum in a dark corner!

The genre has passed through several phases since José Manuel Calderón recorded what is generally recognized as the first bachata single (“Borracho de amor” and “Que será de mi (Condena)”) in 1961. Indeed, long before Calderón, guitar music was the music of choice in the places of ill repute which became home to bachata. The guitar and guitar music like bolero and son were also the staples of the campo, the countryside, and with the death of dictator Rafael Trujillo in 1961 a number of musicians left the campo to record in the capital. The dictator’s family had virtually monopolized the music industry in the country, and when he was killed entrepreneurs began recording the first generation of bachateros. At this point the music was not yet referred to as bachata, but rather as “bolero campesino”. The word bachata originally denoted an informal party where guitar music was generally played; only later did it come to signify the music itself, and then in a denigrating manner.

When Calderón recorded, bachata was essentially a type of bolero, very little different from the Puerto Rican, Ecuadorian, Mexican and Peruvian music that inspired it. In subsequent years, the music began to define itself as a genre which, while still based principally on the bolero rhythm, is easily distinguishable from it. In order to understand these changes it is useful to divide the genre into the following categories, each of which roughly corresponds to a time period:
Bachata-bolero, Cabaret Bachata, Sexual Double Entendre Bachata, Tecno-bachata, Frontier Bachata, Romantic Bachata, Vallenato and Bachata, The New York School.

The bachata played today uses electric guitar and has phrasing which is more rhythmic and groove-like than in earlier styles. The evolution to electric has perhaps helped make bachata more accessible.  Some associate Juan Luis Guerra's Grammy winning 1992 release, Bachata Rosa, with bachata's rise in legitimacy and international recognition. Others argue that Guerra had very little to do with bachata's rise, and that, although he used the word bachata in an album title, he never actually even recorded a song in a typical bachata style.
In 2006, the Dominican group Aventura, based in New York City, was probably the best known bachata group worldwide, with its single "Obsesión" having dominated for a long time radio play both in Latin America, US Latino markets, and countries as distant as Italy and Sweden. While they are superseded at the international level by Aventura, for the Dominican audience, the most popular of the modern bachateros have been Antony Santos and Luis Vargas. Other artists of note include Raulin Rodriguez, Zacarias Ferreira, Frank Reyes, Monchy y Alexandra, Domenic Marte, Xtreme, Andy Andy, Elvis Martinez, Leonardo Paniagua, Los Toros Band, and Joe Veras.

The basic footwork is a series of simple steps that produce a back and forth or sideways motion. A schematic footwork would be as follows: starting with the right foot make a chasse to the right on counts 1,2. On 3, touch the left toe beside your right foot (alternatively, tapping the left toe in place, i.e., apart from the right foot, make an upwards jerk with the left hip). Then do the same from your left foot. The character of the dance is achieved through sensual hip and body movements. You can also add turns to spice it up a little or dance closer together or far apart depending on how comfortable you are with your dance partner. The more you dance with someone the more likely you will be able to lead them or be led. Usually the male leads and the female follows.

Related Classes: Salsa, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Practica

Practica is a class that practices social dancing, or dancing with a partner without any fixed choreographed routine.  The students practice leading and following and the instructor moves from student to student to correct any specific mistakes.

Practical: it's like a 5 min private lesson while social dancing where you are corrected on your lead/follow techniques, spins, styling, shines, body movements... depending on the dance that you are doing.  Actfa provides practical for Salsa, Tango, Bachata and other social dances.

It's a great course for those who
a) find it hard to bring their dance moves from the classroom to the dance floor ("it's ok in class but I can't do it while social dancing"...)
b) want some one-on-one criticism and direction that is specifically catered to your needs
c) wanna be a great social dancer but don't know how

Quite a few who have been through the course say that it is one of the classes that they have really benefited from.


Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Argentine Tango, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Jazroc

Jazroc: It is a simple partner dance that great for beginners to learn and perform due to its simplicity in movements and catchy jazzy music.  Similar to Merengue or Swing, the lead and follow style introduces fundamental partner moves in an easy to learn way, which can be applied later in more difficult dances.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Jive, Modern Jive, West Coast Swing, Night Club 2 Step
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Zouk

Zouk Classes Singapore DanceZouk is a Brazilian partner dance that is popular among Salsa and Bachata dancers in the social scene in Singapore. It has a deep rhythmic vibe and is characterized by the smooth sensual sway of the hips, head movements and full body dips, with an interesting and different feel as compared to other Latin dances, making it a fun dance to explore, especially if you are looking for something different and new to try.

The dance is characterized by distinctive head movements like Cabeça and Boneca with a lot of body and hip movements.  It is a style of rhythmic music originating from the French islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique. It has its roots in compas music from Haiti,. Zouk means "party" or "festival" in the local creole of French with English and African influences, all three of which contribute the sound. In Africa, it is popular in franco/luso countries, while on the African islands of Cape Verde they have developed their own type of zouk. In Europe it is particularly popular in France, and in North America the Canadian province of Quebec.

Origins

The zouk music style was invented in the early 1980s when many different styles were fused, such as compas, balakadri, the Dominica based cadence and bal granmoun dances, mazurka and biguine, French and American pop, and kadans, gwo ka and other indigenous styles.

Zouk-Lambada (also called Lambada-Zouk) is a group of closely related dance styles based on or evolved from the lambada dance style and is typically danced to zouk music or other music containing the zouk beat. There are two dominant styles of Zouk-Lambada called (Brazilian) zouk and Lambazouk. The Zouk-Lambada dancing styles are among the most popular non-ballroom dances for couples in Brazil, others being Forró, Lambada, Samba de gafieira and Salsa.

Brazilian zouk

Brazilian zouk is mainly danced in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro and Brasilia), The Netherlands and some other European countries, It uses a modified, slower, smoother, even more sensual version of the lambada and is typically danced on Zouk-love style music. In the Netherlands this dance style goes under the name of zouk-love.

The Brazilian zouk dance style was first developed by Jaime Aroxa, Adilio Porto and Renata Peçanha in Rio de Janeiro around 1989. In the Netherlands it was first introduced (in the early 2000s) by Claudio Gomes. Today Brazilian zouk is also danced on R&B, Latin pop and Arabic music, mixed with a zouk music beat.

Unlike salsa, which is led with the hands; Brazilian zouk is led by more parts of the body, noticeably the glued-to-each-other hips of the partners. Thus, in a basic sideways movement, it is the hips that move first, followed by the rest of the body, and this is part of what makes the dance so sensual. However, in various moves the dance partners are also connected by eye contact, legs, arms, shoulders, head, etc.

When practicing zouk in dance classes, teachers generally warn women to be very careful with their backs and necks, as two of the most distinctive and commented-on movements are the cambré (arching backwards to a greater or lesser degree, sometimes even below the waist) and the specific 'hair movements' or ' head movements' for the woman. If not done properly this could lead to injury.
As of today Zouk is becoming well known and apart from the original styles Lambada (faster) and Zouk (latter development) some people distinguish other styles like Soulzouk, NeoZouk and Zouk-Revolution. Whether these are truly separate styles or just individual ways of dancing zouk is, however, still a point of debate.

Lambazouk

In many countries the term Lambazouk refers to the Lambada dance style or a variation of it, danced to Zouk music. It is mainly danced in North-East Brazil (Porto Seguro) and Spain. It differs from Brazilian Zouk in the way the steps are performed on the music. To put it simple, Brazilian Zouk is danced on the dominant beat ("toom-cheek-cheek"), while Lambazouk is danced on the small beats ("cheek-cheek-toom"). In general the Lambazouk/Lambada dancing style is more suitable for fast tempo music, while Brazilian zouk is more suitable for slow tempo music. It is also very common practice to switch fluently between these dancing styles during a single Zouk music song.

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Salsa, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Lumbia

Lumbia is a slow salsa dance, which focuses on the social aspect of making friends, having fun, dancing to classic romantic and slow songs.  Lumbia as a dance highlights the culture and social aspect of the dance as much as the dance itself.  Salsa, danced to a slower beat, makes it conducive for beginners to dance and enjoy themselves.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Casino Rueda

Salsa Rueda Dance Classes SingaporeRueda de Casino (Rueda, Casino Rueda, Salsa Rueda) is a particular type of round dancing of Salsa.  Lots of fun both on the dance floor and in class, Rueda is a great hit amongst Salsa dancers in Singapore and popular in Actfa Dance School Singapore because of its engaging and fun nature.  It is a great dance for Salsa beginner dancers who are scared to dance the whole song with a single partner because they cannot remember their steps : we change partners throughout the dance, and the leader will tell you what moves to do!

What is Rueda de Casino?  Rueda is a form of Salsa that is danced in a group and is great for making friends on the dance floor.  Pairs of dancers form a circle, with dance moves called out by one person, a caller (or 'Líder' or 'cantante' in Spanish). Many of the moves involve the swapping of partners.  

Rueda de Casino is as close to synchronized swimming - I mean Salsa dancing! - as you can get on the Salsa dance floor.  Gathered in a circle, Salsa dancers execute the same moves in what seems like a pre-determined set of choreographed moves. Then, getting closer, you realize that there is actually a leader calling out the moves for everyone to execute at the same time!

The Rueda was developed in Havana, Cuba in the late 1950s and early 1960s by the famous group Guaracheros de Regla and one of its main choreographers and creators was Jorge Alfaro from San Miguel del Padrón, a soloist of a comparsa.

The names of the moves are mostly in Spanish, some in English (or Spanglish; e.g., "un fly"). Some names are known in slightly different versions, easily recognizable by Spanish-speaking dancers, but may be confusing to the rest.

Rueda is not only popular in Cuba and the U.S.A., but in many other countries around the world - there are many active groups in at least Hungary, Israel, Norway, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Spain, Australia, Switzerland and the UK. At least in Germany and Israel, some of the calls are in German and Hebrew respectively.

Although the names of the calls are presently the same across the board, the different towns in Cuba use their own calls. This was due to the fact that when the pioneers of Rueda de Casino started, they wanted to keep others from participating in their Rueda. Nowadays many local variations of the calls can be found. They can change from town to town or even from teacher to teacher.

Nowadays, Rueda tries to be more "inclusive" and not "exclusive" and, in at least Singapore, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, Callers are choosing calls to coincide more with the regular calls made in Miami, parts of U.S.A., and Europe. Also, when instructors want to keep classes fresh and fun, they often make up new interesting calls. While this may decrease the fun of dancing rueda with people you just met, it makes for an expanding world of Rueda.

Casino Rueda scenes may be seen in the movie Dance with Me and in the music video clip No me dejes de querer by Gloria Estefan.

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Salsa, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Cuban Salsa

Cuban-style salsa (also called Casino) can be danced either on the down beat ("a tiempo") or the upbeat ("a contratiempo"). Beats 1,3,5 and 7 are downbeats and 2,4,6 and 8 are upbeats.

An essential element is the "Cuba step" (also known as Guapea), where the leader does a backward basic on 1-2-3 and a forward basic on 5-6-7. Usually the fourth beat is not counted. The follower does the same, thereby mirroring the leader's movement. Another characteristic of this style is that in many patterns the leader and follower circle around each other.

The cross body lead is an essential step in this style too and is referred to as Salida Cubana or as Dile que no in Rueda de Casino Dancing. This move becomes essential in the more complex derivative of Cuban Casino leading to the many moves of Rueda, or wheel dance. Here multiple couples exchange partners and carry out moves synchronized by a caller.

Cuban Salsa Dances: Performance at Student Recital, Performance at Esplanade


Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Afro Cuban Rumba

Afro Cuban Rumba Dance Class SingaporeCuban Rumba

The Afro Cuban Rumba is a dance that is closely linked to the Salsa dance community due to the similar origins of both dances.  In fact, the Afro Cuban Rumba style greatly influences the body movements and stylings of Salsa dancers in Singapore and around the world.  Many dance moves taught in the Salsa classes in Singapore, especially with regards to Shines and Styling have footwork, body and hand movements taken from Afro Cuban Rumba.  Locally, Actfa Dance School Singapore has performed various Cuban Rumba performances in the Esplanade Da:ns Festival and also shared the love of this dance through various dance classes around Singapore.

In Cuba, Rumba is a generic term covering a variety of musical rhythms and associated dances. The rumba has its influences in the music brought to Cuba by Spanish colonizers as well as Africans brought to Cuba as slaves.Rumba developed in the Cuban provinces of Havana and Matanzas in the late 19th century. As a energetic Afro-Cuban dance, Rumba was often suppressed and restricted because it was viewed as dangerous and lewd.Afro-Cuban rumba is entirely different than Ballroom Rumba, or the African style of pop music called rumba. Rumba developed in rural Cuba, and is still danced in Havana, Mantanzas and other Cuban cities as well as rural areas, especially those with a significant or predominant African community, although now it is infused with influences from Jazz and Hip hop. A Cuban Rumba song often begins with the soloist singing meaningless syllables, which is called 'diana(s)'. He then may proceed to improvise lyrics stating the reason for holding the present Rumba ('decimar'; span.: to make ten-line stanzas), or instead tunes into a more or less fixed song such as: "Ave Maria Morena" (Yambú, Anónimo), "Llora Como Lloré" (Guaguancó, S. Ramirez), "Cuba Linda, Cuba Hermosa" (Guaguancó, R.Deza), "China de Oro (Laye Laye)" (Columbia), "Malanga (Murió)" (Columbia)". Cuban Rumba can be broken down into three types: Yambú, Guaguancó and Columbia.

Dance Classes Singapore: Afro Cuban Rumba

Rumba Yambú
Yambú is the oldest and slowest known style of rumba, sometimes called the Old People's Rumba. It uses the slowest beat of the three Rumba styles and incorporates movements feigning frailty. It can be danced alone (especially by women) or by men and women together. Although male dancers may flirt with female dancers during the dance, they do not use the vacunao of Rumba Guaguancó.

Rumba Guaguancó
Rumba Guaguancó is faster than yambú, with more complex rhythms, and involves overtly flirtatious movements between a man and a woman in the roles of "Rooster" and "Hen".The woman both entices and "protects herself" from the man, who tries to catch the woman off-guard with a vacunao -- tagging her with the flip of a handkerchief or by throwing his arm, leg or pelvis in her direction in an act of symbolic sexual contact. To defend herself, she may cover with her hand, or use her skirt to protect her pelvis and whip the sexual energy away from her body. Guaguancó most likely inherited the idea of the 'vacunao' from yuca or macuta dances, which were both brought to Cuba by Bantú ethnic groups.

Musical Form of Rumba Guaguancó
The Rumba Guaguancó consists of two main sections. The first, the canto, features the lead vocalist, who performs an extended text that is sometimes partially improvised. Underneath the vocal three interlocking rhythmic parts are played: one or two drummers playing on differently tuned congas perform an ostinato (recurring pattern), while another musician taps a pattern on the side of one drum with two hard sticks, called palitos. Another, usually the lead singer, plays a standardized clave part.[1] This section usually lasts a few minutes, until the lead vocalist signals for the other singers to repeat a short refrain, in call and response. This signals the beginning of the second section, the montuno which features the dancers, as they engage in their "rooster and hen" antics, and also the band, with extended instrumental solos.

Rumba Columbia
Rumba Columbia (not "Colombia") is a fast and energetic Rumba, with a 6/8 feel, which is often accompanied by a 6/8 (Spanish 'seis por ocho') beat struck on a hoe or a bell. It is assumed that the Columbia originated in hamlets in the interior of Cuba rather than the suburbs of the larger cities from where other types of Cuban Rumba stem. Solo, traditionally male, dancers provoke the drummers, especially the player of the smallest drum (Quinto, here also soloist drum), to play complex rhythms that they imitate through their creative and sometimes acrobatic movements. Men may also compete with other men to display their agility, strength, confidence and even sense of humor. Columbia incorporates many movements derived from Congo dances as well as Spanish flamenco, and more recently dancers have incorporated breakdancing and hip hop moves. Women are also beginning to dance Columbia, too.According to Cuban percussionist, singer, composer and historian Gregorio 'el Goyo' Hernandez, who became widely accepted as a specialist in Cuban Rumba after his album "La Rumba Es Cubana: Su Historia" (2004, Unicornio No. 6004), Cuban Rumba Columbia has its origins in the drum patterns and chants of religious Cuban Abakuá traditions. Fact is that the 'cáscara' or 'palito' rhythm of Columbia, either beaten with two sticks on a piece of bamboo or on the rim of the congas, is the same as the one played in Abakuá chants, which is played with two small plaited rattles ('erikundi') filled with beans or similar objects. The drum patterns of the lowest conga drum is essentially the same in both Columbia and Abakuá as well.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda
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Kizomba

Kizomba Dance Class Singapore

The Kizomba dance in Singapore is danced to music similar to that of the romantic Zouk and is known for it's sensual style. Fondly known as Angolan Tango, it is a modern yet traditional dance. It shares the same intimacy and romance of Argentine Tango but with the flirty zest and twist of many modern Latin dances. Currently taking the dance world by storm, this dance celebrates a sensual passion for dance that you won’t be able to resist! It is currently a new and popular dance in Singapore and around the world.

Related Classes: Ballroom Tango, Argentine Tango, Zouk, Bachata
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Merengue

Merengue was made the official music and dance of the Dominican Republic by Rafael Trujillo. Partners hold each other in a closed position. The man holds the woman's waist with his right hand while keeping his left hand/her right hand at the woman's eye level. The merengue is a two-step beat requiring both partners to bend their knees slightly left and right. This in turn makes the hips move left and right. When danced correctly, the hips of the man and woman will move in the same direction throughout the song. Partners may walk sideways or circle each other, in small steps. They can further switch to a double handhold position and do separate turns without letting go each other's hands or momentarily releasing one hand. During these turns they may twist and tie their handhold into intricate pretzels. Other choreography is possible.

Some say it was derived from the "paso de la empalizada" (pole-fence step). There are also legends about a limping war hero (or El Presidente of a banana republic himself, in some versions) who had to step in this way while dancing because of wounds, and polite (or clueless) public imitated him.  Although the tempo of the music may be frantic, the upper body is kept majestic and turns are slow, typically four beats/steps per complete turn.

In the social dancing of the United States the "empalizada" style is replaced by exaggerated Cuban motion, taught in chain ballroom studios for dances of Latin American origin (Cha-cha-cha, Rumba, Mambo, Salsa).


Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Salsa, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Street Cha Cha

The cha-cha-cha (in Spanish cha-cha-chá) is a Latin American dance of Cuban origin. It corresponds to the Cha-cha-cha music introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrín. See Cha-cha-chá (Cuban dance) for a description of the Cuban evolution of the dance.

There are three flavors of Cha-cha-cha dance, differing by the place of the chachacha chasse with respect to the musical bar. Ballroom Cha-cha and street Cha-cha-cha in Cuba count "two-three-chachacha". Country/western Cha-cha-cha and Latin street Cha-cha-cha in many places other than Cuba count "one-two-chachacha" or "chachacha-three-four".

Guajira, a product of triple Mambo via Danzon predates all the "social" versions. The Guajira rhythm, is still used as the basis by Cubans and Puerto Ricans, who are of the belief, that the other versions were anglicised to suit the American market. As is usual with the more authentic forms of dance, a very limited variety of steps is used. It can still be seen danced in many South Florida night clubs.

Cha Cha is either danced to authentic Latin music, or more contemporary Latin Pop or Latin Rock. The music for the ballroom Cha-cha-cha is energetic and with a steady beat. The "Latin" cha-cha-cha is slower, more sensual and may involve complicated rhythms. "Cowboy" Cha-Cha-Cha is danced basically to any "four to the floor" music; in addition there are a number of C/W novelty dances with the names that include "cha-cha-cha".

Footwork: In general, steps in all directions should be taken first with the ball of the foot in contact with the floor, and then with the heel lowering when the weight is fully transferred; however, some steps require that the heel remain lifted from the floor. When weight is released from a foot, the heel should release from the floor first, allowing the toe to maintain contact with the floor.

Hip movement: In traditional American Rhythm style, Latin hip movement is achieved through the alternate bending and straightening action of the knees, though in modern competitive dancing, the technique is virtually identical to the International Latin style. In the International Latin style, the weighted leg is almost always straight. The free leg will bend, allowing the hips to naturally settle into the direction of the weighted leg. As a step is taken, a free leg will straighten the instant before it receives weight. It should then remain straight until it is completely free of weight again.


Related Classes: Bachata, Salsa, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Modern Jive

Modern Jive is a dance style derived from Swing, Lindy Hop, Rock and Roll, Salsa and others.  It is danced to a steady 4/4 time, making it simple and easy to dance (by removing the syncopation in the steps).  It's great for beginners and largely danced to pop songs with a steady beat.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Jive, Jazroc, West Coast Swing, Night Club 2 Step
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West Coast Swing

West Coast Swing is a partner dance with its roots in Lindy Hop. It is a relatively new social dance in Singapore, but is danced to pop songs, making it a favorite among young Singaporeans.  WCS is the 'Official State dance of California'. San Diego, San Francisco and Los Angeles all argue about what city West Coast Swing originated in, however Los Angeles California area tends to win the debate.

West Coast Swing originated from an earlier dance known as the Savoy Style Lindy, which was done at the Savoy Ballroom in New York in the early 1930's. Although WCS was not invented by, it was indirectly spawned by a man whose name was Dean Collins, who also danced at the Savoy while living in New York. It is characterised by a distinctive elastic look that results from its basic extension-compression technique of partner connection, and is danced primarily in a slotted area on the dance floor. The dance allows for both partners to improvise steps while dancing together.

The origins of the dance that became known as West Coast Swing can be traced to the swing era. During this period many jazz, blues, and western musicians incorporated, or emphasized, the “swing” in their music. Now, West Coast Swing is very popular with the pop music artistes such as: Neyo, Beyonce, Justin Timberlake and many more.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Jive, Modern Jive, Jazroc, Night Club 2 Step
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Night Club 2 Step

Night Club Two Step is an American style dance created in 1961 by Buddy Schwimmer. Evolved from other dances like the Rumba, and the New York Hustle. However, NC2S is much less structured than Latin Rumba because it was adapted for club-style environment and danced in a more casual, natural & relaxed manner.  Considered the romantic dance for the WCS community, it is done primarily to Contemporary Ballad music but can also be done to those music used for Zouk as well. One such popular song perfect for NC2S is “Lady in Red” Night Club Two Step follows a quick-quick slow rhythm, however several slow steps can be used in succession to emphasize the romantic feeling often associated with night club dancing.

The "Two Step", like all dances has gone through changes over time. It has evolved into two different feeling dances - "Night Club Two Step" and "Ballroom Two Step". These two variations have very different feelings. The "Ballroom Two Step" is very gliding, continuous, strong and powerful with a big sweeping feeling. It is precise and quite technical. "Night Club Two Step" feels more like a choppy Cha Cha and is quite compact. It has a more casual relaxed feeling.

The "Two Step" is a dance you can do in night clubs as well as ballrooms, weddings, cruises, etc. It's an alternative to the "Slow" dance. That's the dance where you stand, put your hands on your partner's waist and your partner puts her arms around your neck and you sway back and forth, back-and-forth etc. Night Club Two Step is one of the easiest dances to master.

Related Classes: Salsa, Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Cuban Salsa, Jazroc, Merengue, Jive, Modern Jive, West Coast Swing
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Latin Rumba

Latin Rumba is a Latin-style partner dance that is slow, elegant and precise.  Students will learn a choreographed routine for their graduation performance.

Rumba is a dance organically related to the rumba genre of Afro-Cuban music. Throughout the history one may trace several styles of dances called "rumba".

Some dancers considered rumba the most erotic and sensual Latin dance, for its relatively slow rhythm and the hip movement. Rumba is actually the second slowest Latin dance: the spectrum runs bolero, rumba, cha-cha-cha, mambo in order of the speed of the beat.

Ballroom rumba derives its movements and music from son, just as the salsa and mambo. When son was brought to the United States it was renamed rumba. It is thought that this occurred due to the name rumba being more exotic and more marketable than Sòn.
Prohibition in the United States caused a flourishing of the relatively tolerated cabaret American rumba, as American tourists flocked to see crude sainetes (short plays) which featured racial stereotypes and generally, though not always, rumba.
American rumba is thought to have contributed to the origin of the cha-cha-cha, and indeed most figures (if not all, somehow) can be reinterpreted in cha-cha-cha.

Early American rumba
This kind of rumba was introduced into American dance salons at the beginning of the 20th century, characterized by high tempo, nearly twice as fast as the modern ballroom rumba, typical examples being the tunes The Peanut Vendor and Siboney.

Ballroom rumba
American style rumba is characterized by the Cuban hip motion or hip sway arising from the bending and straightening of the knee, as opposed to Latin hip motion stepping on a straight leg, which is used in international style rumba.
Additionally, the same move in terms of footwork often goes by a different name in American versus international.

Related Classes: Latin Cha Cha, Latin Samba, Salsa, Jive, Paso Doble
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Latin Cha Cha

The Cha-cha-cha (in Spanish cha-cha-chá) is a Latin American dance of Cuban origin. It corresponds to the Cha-cha-cha music introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrín. See Cha-cha-chá (Cuban dance) for a description of the Cuban evolution of the dance.

In ballroom dancing, it is increasingly popular to call the dance cha-cha.  The cooler dance teachers Pierre Margolie from the United Kingdom, a founder of the Latin American Faculty of the ISTD, visited Cuba in 1952 to discover mambo (some say, rumba) danced with the triple step in place of the slow one. He brought this dance idea to Europe and eventually created what is known now as ballroom Cha-cha-cha.

There are three flavors of Cha-cha-cha dance, differing by the place of the chachacha chasse with respect to the musical bar. Ballroom Cha-cha and street Cha-cha-cha in Cuba count "two-three-chachacha". Country/western Cha-cha-cha and Latin street Cha-cha-cha in many places other than Cuba count "one-two-chachacha" or "chachacha-three-four".

Guajira, a product of triple Mambo via Danzon predates all the "social" versions. The Guajira rhythm, is still used as the basis by Cubans and Puerto Ricans, who are of the belief, that the other versions were anglicised to suit the American market. As is usual with the more authentic forms of dance, a very limited variety of steps is used. It can still be seen danced in many South Florida night clubs.

Cha Cha is either danced to authentic Latin music, or more contemporary Latin Pop or Latin Rock. The music for the ballroom Cha-cha-cha is energetic and with a steady beat. The "Latin" cha-cha-cha is slower, more sensual and may involve complicated rhythms. "Cowboy" Cha-Cha-Cha is danced basically to any "four to the floor" music; in addition there are a number of C/W novelty dances with the names that include "cha-cha-cha".

Footwork: In general, steps in all directions should be taken first with the ball of the foot in contact with the floor, and then with the heel lowering when the weight is fully transferred; however, some steps require that the heel remain lifted from the floor. When weight is released from a foot, the heel should release from the floor first, allowing the toe to maintain contact with the floor.

Hip movement: In traditional American Rhythm style, Latin hip movement is achieved through the alternate bending and straightening action of the knees, though in modern competitive dancing, the technique is virtually identical to the International Latin style. In the International Latin style, the weighted leg is almost always straight. The free leg will bend, allowing the hips to naturally settle into the direction of the weighted leg. As a step is taken, a free leg will straighten the instant before it receives weight. It should then remain straight until it is completely free of weight again.

International Latin style Cha Cha
Cha cha cha is one of the five dances of the "Latin American" program of international ballroom competitions (where it is officially has become known as "Cha cha").  The basis of the modern dance was laid down in the 1960s by Walter Laird and other top competitors of the time.

In general Cha cha steps should be kept compact and the dance is danced generally without any rise and fall. The modern ballroom technique of Cha-cha (and other ballroom dances) is a result of gradual evolution, and in many respects the technique differs significantly from the earlier days. Also, the International Style diverged from the technique of the American Style Cha-cha.

Basic step of cha-cha-cha
The basic pattern involves a checked forward step with the left foot retaining some weight on the right foot, the knee of the right leg being allowed to flex and close to the back of the left knee, the left leg having straightened just prior to receiving part weight. This step is taken on the second beat of the bar. Full weight is returned to the right leg on the second step (beat three.) The fourth beat is split in two so the count of the next three steps is 4-and-1. These three steps constitute the Cha-cha chasse. A step to the side is taken with the left foot, the right foot is half closed to the left foot (typically leaving both feet under the hips or perhaps closed together), and finally there is a last step to the left with the left foot. The length of the steps in the chasse depend very much on the effect the dancer is attempting to make.

While one partner dances the bar just described the other partner dances as follows. A step is taken back on the right foot, the knee being straightened as full weight is taken. The other leg is allowed to remain straight. It is possible it will flex slightly but no deliberate flexing of the free leg is attempted. This is quite different from technique associated with Salsa, for instance. On the next beat (beat three) weight is returned to the left leg. Then a Cha cha chasse is danced RLR. Each partner is now in a position to dance the bar their partner just danced. Hence the fundamental construction of Cha cha extends over two bars.

The checked first step is a later development in the International Chacha. Because of the action used during the forward step (the one taking only part weight) the basic pattern turns left, whereas in earlier times chacha was danced without rotation of the alignment. Hip actions are allowed to occur at the end of every step. For steps taking a single beat the first half of the beat constitutes the foot movement and the second half is taken up by the hip movement.

Over the history there has been two schools of dancing the Cha-cha chasse. In one school both knees are allowed to be flexed on the count of `and' to eliminate an increase in height as the feet are brought towards each other. In the other school the leading foot is placed with the checked knee and the "bopping" is eliminated by hip action.

Related Classes: Latin Rumba, Latin Samba, Salsa, Jive, Paso Doble
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Latin Samba

Samba is a lively, rhythmical dance of Brazilian origin in 2/4 time danced under the Samba music. However, there are three steps to every bar, making the Samba feel like a 3/4 timed dance. Its origins include the Maxixe. There are two major streams of Samba dance that differ significantly: the modern Ballroom Samba, described in this article, and the traditional Samba of Brazil. The Brazilian Ballroom Samba is called "Gafieira".

The ballroom Samba is danced to music in 2/4 or 4/4 time. The basic movements are counted either 1-2 or 1-a-2, and are danced with a slight downward bouncing or dropping action. This action is created through the bending and straightening of the knees, with bending occurring on the beats of 1 and 2, and the straightening occurring on the "a".

As a ballroom dance, the samba is a partner dance. Ballroom samba, like other ballroom dances, is very disconnected from the origins and evolution of the music and dance that gives it its name. It is a form created for its suitability as a partner dance. The dance movements, which do not change depending on the style of samba music being played, borrows some movements from Afro-Brazilian traditional dances such those used in candomblé rituals and the chamadas of capoeira angola.

Related Classes: Latin Cha Cha, Latin Rumba, Salsa, Jive, Paso Doble, Brazilian Samba
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Jive

Jive is a dance style in 4/4 time that originated among African-Americans in the early 1940s. It is a lively and uninhibited variation of the Jitterbug, a form of Swing dance.

In Ballroom dancing, Jive is one of the five International Latin dances. In competition it is danced at a speed of 44 bars per minute, although in other cases this is reduced to between 32 and 40 bars per minute.  Many of its basic patterns are similar to these of the East Coast Swing with the major difference of highly syncopated rhythm of the Triple Steps (Chasses), which use straight eighths in ECS and hard swing in Jive.

Swing Dance
The term "swing dance" commonly refers to a group of dances that developed concurrently with the swing style of jazz music in the 1920s, '30s and '40s, although the earliest of these dance forms predate swing jazz music. The best known of these dances is the Lindy Hop, a popular partner dance that originated in Harlem and is still danced today. While the majority of swing dances began in African American communities as vernacular African American dances, a number of forms (Balboa, for example) developed within Anglo-American or other ethnic group communities.

The earliest forms of swing dance, such as the Black Bottom, charleston and tap dance, are associated with Dixieland jazz, which developed in New Orleans in the south of the United States. These sorts of dances traveled north with jazz to cities like New York, Kansas City, and Chicago in the Great Migration that began in the 1920s, where rural blacks traveled north to escape persecution, Jim Crow laws, lynching and, later, high unemployment in the South during the Great Depression.

Swing jazz features the syncopated timing associated with African American and West African music and dance — a combination of crotchets and quavers (quarter notes and eighth notes) that many swing dancers interpret as 'triple steps' and 'steps' — yet also introduces changes in the way these rhythms were played — a distinct delay or 'relaxed' approach to timing.

Today there are swing dance scenes in many developed countries throughout the world. Lindy Hop is often the most popular, though each city and country varies preferences various dances in different degrees. Each local swing dance community has a distinct local culture and defines "swing dance" and the "appropriate" music to accompany it in different ways.

Forms of Swing
In many scenes outside the United States the term "Swing dancing" is used to refer generically to one or all of the following swing era dances: Lindy Hop, Charleston, Shag, Balboa and Blues. This group is often extended to include West Coast Swing, East Coast Swing, Hand Dancing, Jive, Rock and Roll, Modern Jive, and other dances developing in the 1940s and later. A strong tradition of social and competitive boogie woogie and acrobatic rock and roll in Europe add these dances to their local swing dance cultures. In Singapore and other scenes, Latin dances such as salsa and Tango are often taught and danced within the "Swing scene", and for many scenes tap dancing and a range of other jazz dances are considered key, as are hip hop and other contemporary African American street dances. The variations continue, dictated by local dance community interests.

Many swing dancers today argue that it is important to dance many styles of partner dance to improve technique, but also to reflect the historical relationship between these dances in the swing era of the 1920s and 1930s. In the Savoy Ballroom, for example, bands would often play waltzes, Latin songs and so on, as well as swinging jazz. Dancers were often familiar with a wide range of popular and traditional dances.

Early forms from the 1930s and 1940s
Lindy Hop evolved in the late 1920s and early 1930s out of Partnered Charleston. It is characterized by an 8-count break away or "swing out" and has an emphasis on improvisation and the ability to easily adapt to include other steps in 8-count and 6-count rhythms. It has been danced to almost every conceivable style of music with blues or jazz rhythm (with the exception of jazz waltzes), as well as non-traditional styles of music such as hip hop.

Balboa is an 8-count dance that emphasizes a strong partner connection and quick footwork. A product of Southern California's crowded ballrooms, Balboa (or "Bal") is primarily danced in close embrace. A library of open figures, called Bal-Swing, evolved from LA Swing, another Southern California dance that was a contemporary of Balboa. While most dancers differentiate between pure Balboa and Bal-Swing, both are considered to be part of the dance. Balboa is frequently danced to fast jazz (usually anything from 180 to 320 beats per minute), though many like to Balboa to slower tempos.

Collegiate Shag was danced in the early thirties to dance music that emphasized a 2-beat rhythm, and was danced in the varieties of single, double, and triple shag. The variety of names describe the amount of slow (step, hop) steps executed before being followed by a single quick, quick rhythm. The most common form recognized as Collegiate Shag is double shag rhythm.

St. Louis Shag done in the "side-by-side" Charleston position. The steps are: rock step, kick forward, step down, kick forward (other leg), stag, step, stomp (repeat). The "stag" is bringing the leg up with the knee bent. As a variation, when repeating, one can do two forward kicks (or "switch, switch", referring to switching feet) in place of the rock step.

Jitterbug dancers in 1938
Jitterbug is often associated with one form of swing dance, but is in fact a general term for all swing dances and is more appropriately used to describe a swing dancer rather than a specific swing dance (i.e. a jitterbug can dance Lindy Hop, Shag, or another swing dance). The term was famously associated with swing era dancers by band leader Cab Calloway because, as he put it, "They look like a bunch of jitterbugs out there on the floor" due to their fast, often bouncy movements.

Later forms from the 1940s, 50s and later
Lindy Hop continued into the 40's and 50's and is featured in many movies of the era featuring Whitey's Lindy Hoppers with Frankie Manning, Dean Collins (whose style would lead to the creation of West Coast Swing), and Hal Takier and the Ray Rand Dancers.
Boogie-woogie developed originally in the 1940s with the rise of boogie woogie music. It is popular today in Europe, and was considered by some to be the European counterpart to East Coast Swing, a Six count dance standardized for the American ballroom industry. It is danced to rock music of various kinds, blues or boogie woogie music but usually not to jazz. As the dance has developed it has also taken to 8-count variations and swing outs similar to Lindy Hop, while keeping the original boogie woogie footwork.
Eastern Swing is an evolution of Fox Trot and the precursor to the more modern East Coast Swing.

East Coast Swing is a simpler 6-count variation. It is also known as Single-Time Swing, Triple-Step Swing, 6-Count Swing, or Rock-a-billy. East Coast Swing has very simple structure and footwork along with basic moves and styling. It is popular for its simple nature, and it is often danced to slow, medium, or fast tempo jazz, blues, or rock and roll.

Imperial Swing is a cross between East Coast and West coast as it is done in slot and in the round. It started at the Club Imperial in St Louis. George Edick, who owned the club, let teenagers dance on the lower level and the swing dancers of the time taught them what was learned from their trips to the east coast. As people traveled around they added parts of west coast,bop and Carolina shag to complement the dance and make it distinctive. People can tell the difference between St Louis dancers and dancers from other parts of the country. "The Imperial" has elements of "East Coast", West Coast", "Carolina Shag", and "Bop".

Carolina Shag originated along the strands between Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Wilmington, North Carolina, during the 1940s. It is most often associated with beach music, which refers to songs that are rhythm and blues based and, according to Bo Bryan, a noted shag historian and resident of Beaufort County, is a term that was coined at Carolina Beach, North Carolina.

Washington Hand Dancing originated in the Washington, D.C., Area in the mid-1950s as D.C.’s own version of swing dancing. From its very beginning, D.C. Hand-dance was referred to and called “D.C. Hand-Dance/Hand-Dancing”, “D.C. Swing”, “D.C. Style” (swing) and “fast dance” (meaning D.C. Hand-Dance). This is the first time a version of “swing” dance was termed “hand-dance/hand-dancing”. D.C. Hand-Dance is characterized by very smooth footwork and movements, and close-in and intricate hand-turns, danced to a 6-beat, 6 to 8 count dance rhythm. The footwork consists of smooth and continuous floor contact, sliding and gliding-type steps (versus hopping and jumping-type steps), and there are no aerials.

Jive is a dance of International Style Ballroom dancing. It initially was based on Eastern swing brought to England by Americans Troops in World War II and evolved before becoming the now standardized form of today.

Push and Whip are Texas forms of swing dance.  Western Swing, also called Country Swing or Country/Western Swing (C/W Swing) is a form with a distinct culture. It resembles East Coast Swing, but adds variations from other country dances. It is danced to country and western music.  Skip Jive A British variant, popular in the 50s and 60s danced to trad jazz.

West Coast Swing was developed in the 1950s as a stylistic variation on Lindy Hop. It is a slotted dance which is danced to a wide variety of music including: blues, rock and roll, country western, smooth and cool jazz. It is popular throughout the United States and Canada but is uncommon in Europe and much of Asia. West coast swing communities are developing in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Rock and Roll - Developing in the 1950s in response to rock and roll music, rock and roll is very popular in Australia and danced socially as well as competitively and in performances. The style has a long association with Lindy Hop in that country, as many of the earliest lindy hoppers in the early 1990s moved to Lindy Hop from a rock and roll tradition. There are ongoing debates about whether rock and roll constitutes swing dancing, particularly in reference to the music to which it is danced: there is some debate as to whether or not it swings. Despite these discussions, many of the older lindy hoppers are also keen rock and roll dancers, with rock and roll characterised by an older dancer (30s and older) than Lindy Hop (25 and under).

Acrobatic Rock and Roll Popular in Europe, acrobatic rock and roll is popularly associated with Russian gymnasts who took up the dance, though it is popular throughout Europe today. It is more a performance dance and sport than a social dance.

Modern Jive - also known as LeRoc and Ceroc - developed in the 1980s, reputedly from a French form of Jive.

Blues Dancing today is an informal type of dance with no fixed patterns and a heavy focus on connection, sensuality and improvisation, often with strong body contact. Although usually done to blues music, it can be done to any slow tempo 4/4 music, including rock ballads and "club" music. "Blues dancing" is popular in many swing dance communities.

Related Classes: Latin Cha Cha, Latin Samba, Salsa, Latin Rumba, Paso Doble, West Coast Swing, Modern Jive
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Paso Doble

Paso Doble or Pasodoble is a lively style of dance to the duple meter march-like pasodoble music. It actually originated in southern France, but is modeled after the sound, drama, and movement of the Spanish bullfight. Paso doble means "two step" in Spanish.

Traditional
Pasodoble is based on music played at bullfights during the bullfighters' entrance (paseo) or during the passes (faena) just before the kill. The leader of this dance plays the part of the matador. The follower generally plays the part of the matador's cape, but can also represent the bull or a flamenco dancer in some figures.

Ballroom
Paso Doble, like Samba, is a progressive International Latin dance. The Paso Doble is the Latin dance most resembling the International Standard style, in that forward steps are taken with the heel lead, the frame is wider and more strictly kept up, and there is significantly different and less hip movement.

A significant number of Paso Doble songs are variants of España Cañi. The song has breaks in fixed positions in the song (two breaks at syllabus levels, three breaks and a longer song at Open levels). Traditionally Paso Doble routines are choreographed to match these breaks, as well as the musical phrases. Accordingly, most other ballroom Paso Doble tunes are written with similar breaks (those without are simply avoided in most competitions).

Because of its inherently choreographed tradition, ballroom Paso Doble for the most part danced only competitively, almost never socially — or at least not without sticking to some sort of previously-learned routine. This said, in Spain, France, Vietnam and some parts of Germany to the west of the river Rhine, it is danced socially as a lead (not choreographed) dance.

Related Classes: Latin Cha Cha, Latin Samba, Salsa, Jive, Latin Rumba
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Slow Waltz

Waltz is a smooth and progressive dance where couples dance in a closed position and in circles around the room.  It has a 3/4 timing, where the steps are executed in triple time rather than in the standard 4/4 timing.

Slow Waltz is the term applied to waltz in countries where Viennese Waltz is the form of waltz commonly practiced. Some confusion occurs when dancers come from these countries to places like the United States where "waltz" events and invitations are not what they might expect.

Slow Waltz was also the name of a dance in the International Standard dance category of ballroom dances. Now it is officially called simply "Waltz", but "Slow Waltz" is still in the informal use, to distinguish from other types of waltzes.

Related Classes: Viennese Waltz, Foxtrot, Tango, Argentine Tango, Quickstep
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Viennese Waltz

Viennese Waltz (German: Wiener Walzer) is the genre of a ballroom dance. At least three different meanings are recognized. In the historically first sense, the name may refer to several versions of the waltz, including the earliest waltzes done in ballroom dancing, danced to the music of Viennese Waltz.

What is now called the Viennese waltz is the original form of the waltz and the first ballroom dance in the closed hold or "waltz" position. The dance that is popularly known as the Waltz is actually the English or slow waltz, danced approximately at 90 beats per minute with 3 beats to the bar (the international standard of 30 measures per minute) while the Viennese Waltz is danced at about 180 beats (58-60 measures) a minute. To this day however, in Germany, Austria and France, the words "Walzer" (German for "waltz") and "valse" (French for "waltz") still implicitly refers to the original dance and not the slow waltz.

The Viennese Waltz is a rotary dance where the dancers are constantly turning either in a clockwise (natural) or anti-clockwise (reverse) direction interspersed with non-rotating change steps to switch between the direction of rotation. A true Viennese waltz consists only of turns and change steps. Other moves such as the fleckerls, American-style figures and side sway or underarm turns are modern inventions and are not normally danced at the annual balls in Vienna. Furthermore, in a properly danced Viennese Waltz, couples do not pass, but turn continuously left and right while travelling counterclockwise around the floor following each other.
As the Waltz evolved, some of the versions that were done at about the original fast tempo came to be called specifically "Viennese Waltz" to distinguish them from the slower waltzes. In the modern ballroom dance, two versions of Viennese Waltz are recognized: International Style and American Style.

Today the Viennese Waltz is a ballroom and partner dance that is part of the International Standard division of contemporary ballroom dance.

History

The Viennese Waltz, so called to distinguish it from the Waltz and the French Waltz, is the oldest of all ballroom dances. It emerged in the second half of the 18th century from the German dance and the Ländler in Austria and in the beginning was disapproved-of on account of its "lasciviousness", e.g. because the ladies' ankles were visible. Later it gained official acceptance and even popularity due to the Congress of Vienna at the beginning of the 19th century and the famous compositions by Josef Lanner, Johann Strauss I and his son, Johann Strauss II.

In the 1920s in Germany the Viennese Waltz became outdated as more modern and dynamic dances emerged. In England the Viennese Waltz acclimatized, there Boston and later Waltz were preferred.

At the beginning of the 1930s the Viennese Waltz had its comeback as a folk dance in Germany and Austria. The former military officer Karl von Mirkowitsch made it acceptable both for society and ballroom, since 1932 the Viennese Waltz has been present on ballroom dance floors. About the same time, the Viennese Waltz had its comeback also as a (folk dance) in The Greater Cleveland Ohio U.S.A. Area. It was because the greatest number of Slovenians (60,000 - 80,000) settled in that area. Slovenia, being right below Vienna Austria, was influenced in their folk dance by the Viennese Waltz. Frankie Yankovic, Slovenian from Cleveland Ohio traveled the world playing his version ("Cleveland Style" as per Polka Hall of Fame, Euclid Ohio)of the Viennese Waltzes. His Blue Skirt Waltz went Platinum 1949. Even in 2007, there are several opportunities to waltz each week in The Greater Cleveland Area. In 1951 Paul Krebs, a dance teacher from Nürnberg, combined the traditional Austrian Waltz with the English style of waltzing and had great success at the dance festival in Blackpool in the same year. Since then the Viennese Waltz is considered a full privilege member of the International Standard ballroom dances; in 1963 it was added to the Welttanzprogramm which is the fundament of European dancing schools.
The Viennese Waltz has always been symbol of political and public sentiments. It was called the "Marseillaise of the heart" (Eduard Hanslick, a critic from Vienna in the past century) and was supposed to "have saved Vienna the revolution" (sentence of a biographer of the composer Johann Strauss I), while Strauss I himself was called the "Napoleon Autrichien" (Heinrich Laube, poet from the north of Germany).

Technique and styles

Musical Form
Fast triple time (usually 3/4 time) - as opposed to typical waltzes which can be between 60-90 beats per minute, Viennese Waltz music (such as the well-known "On the Beautiful Blue Danube" by Johann Strauss Junior) is typically in the range of 120-180 bpm.
Slow harmonic pace - same chord is used throughout a whole bar and usually repeated for several bars.
Simple Harmonies - occasionally uses chromatic or dissonant appoggiaturas.
Homophonic texture
"Um-Cha-Cha" accompaniment - bass note on first beat then other notes on second and third.
Ternary form ABA style - Waltz 1-Waltz 2-Waltz 1
Vamp base - the first beat of one bar is the key note, and in the following bar it is the dominant note. This pattern continues until the chord changes. This only occurs in some waltzes.

International Style Viennese Waltz
International Style Viennese Waltz is danced in closed position. The syllabus is limited to Natural and Reverse Turns, Changes, Fleckerls, Contra Check, Left Whisk, and canter time Pivots (Canter Pivots).

American Style Viennese Waltz
American Style Viennese Waltz has much more freedom, both in dance positions and syllabus.

Related Classes: Slow Waltz, Foxtrot, Tango, Argentine Tango, Quickstep
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Ballroom Tango

Ballroom Tango, divided in recent decades into the "International" (English) and "European" styles, has descended from the tango styles that developed when the tango first went abroad to Europe and North America. The dance was simplified, adapted to the preferences of conventional ballroom dancers, and incorporated into the repertoire used in International Ballroom dance competitions. English Tango was first codified in October 1922, when it was proposed that it should only be danced to modern tunes, ideally at 30 bars per minute (i.e. 120 beats per minute - assuming a 4/4 measure).

Subsequently the English Tango evolved mainly as a highly competitive dance, while the American Tango evolved as an unjudged social dance with an emphasis on leading and following skills. This has led to some principal distinctions in basic technique and style. Nevertheless there are quite a few competitions held in the American style, and of course mutual borrowing of technique and dance patterns happens all the time.

Ballroom tangos use different music and styling from Argentine tangos, with more staccato movements and the characteristic "head snaps". The head snaps are totally foreign to Argentine and Uruguayan tango, and were introduced in 1934 under the influence of a similar movement in the legs and feet of the Argentine tango, and the theatrical movements of the pasodoble. This style became very popular in Germany and was soon introduced to England, one of the first proponents being Mr Camp. The movements were very popular with spectators, but not with competition judges (Source: PJS Richardson, History of English Ballroom Dancing, Herbert Jenkins 1946, page 101-102)

Related Classes: Viennese Waltz, Foxtrot, Slow Waltz, Argentine Tango, Quickstep
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Foxtrot

Foxtrot, a type of ballroom dance has it's origin from Harry Fox in the 1940s. It is characterized by long, smooth flowing movements across the dance floor.  The steps usually consist of a combinations of chasses, walks like most ballroom dances. It is similar to the waltz but danced in the 4/4 time rather than the 3/4 time.

Related Classes: Viennese Waltz, Slow Waltz, Tango, Argentine Tango, Quickstep
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Quickstep

Quickstep is the fun and flirty dance of the 5 standard ballroom dances.  It is characterized by quick and flowing steps with syncopated footwork and danced to light-hearted numbers that gives it it's fun and upbeat feel.  It is developed in the 1920s in New York and first danced by the Carribbean and African dancers who mixed Foxtrot & Charleston together.

Related Classes: Viennese Waltz, Foxtrot, Tango, Argentine Tango, Slow Waltz
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Senior HipHop

Are you above 50 and looking for a place to dance and exercise in Singapore? HipHop Seniors Dance Class Singapore

Actfa has dance classes for those above 50 years old. We are looking to start dance classes like Jazz/Contemporary, Hip Hop, Salsa, Tango, Lumbia, Jazroc for mature students in Singapore.

Dancing is a good way to exercise, stretch and move your body.  It is fun with funky music and lots of laughter.  From HipHop dance to Salsa dance, Yoga to Cha Cha, make like-minded friends and have loads of fun expressing yourselves in our seniors dance classes.  Who said seniors can't dance HipHop or Kpop?  We will prove them wrong!

Come join us if you are interested!

Featured classes (and more to come):
Seniors HipHop    every Thursday 4 - 5pm
Seniors Yoga        every Saturday 3 - 4pm

$125 for 13 classes
Classes on weekdays morning & afternoon, nights and also weekends.
Call 6225 0150 now to enquire!

Latin Jazz

Latin Jazz is a fusion of latin dance rhythms and techniques from Salsa, Cha-cha-cha, Rumba, Samba, Zouk, Lambada and more, with modern jazz and contemporary styles.

Starting with jazz and contemporary warm ups that trains and strengthens technique and flexibility, we move into breaking down the intricacies of Latin dance rhythms, movements and attitude.  With simple across the floor combos to learn Latin-style turns and jumps, we then combine these into a fluid dance routine to complete your Latin Jazz experience.

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Ballet

Ballet is a foundation class that works the poise, grace and lines of a dancer.  From the basics of Ballet, students will learn to apply these techniques to other dances, giving them the ‘feel’ and grace of a professional dancer.

Ballet goes way back to the early seventeenth century where dancers performed as a form of entertainment to a crowd during intermissions of operas. Soon ballet grew popular and had more impact on the crowd. Gradually, the ballet structure was formed defined by a style of its own.

In 1661, King Louis XIV of France founded the Académie Royale de Musique et de Danse, establishing Paris as the center of academic ballet. Over time, Russia became the international center of ballet, combining the strength and passion of Italian style with the softness and fluidity of the French school.

Today ballet is one of the top three most popular dances that people will pick up. It has a rigid syllabus for dancers to follow and get their way to the top. Ballet is divided into the grades as well as the majors. The grades are just for leisure dancers while the majors are for the more serious dancers who aspire to be instructors or professional dancers.

In ballet, there are two segments namely the barre work and the center work. The barre work is always done first as a warm up. Students will do plies and all the leg exercise to stretch and strength the leg muscles. After that shall they proceed on to the center to do short dance exercises. In the more advanced level, the duration of these pieces get longer as more techniques are being added to one piece of music.

Furthermore, when girls proceed on to the majors, they will be dancing on pointe. Special pointe shoes are worn so the girls can dance on their toes. For guys, they still remain in their soft shoes but they have to do more technical stuff compared to girls (e.g. jump higher, spin greater number of rounds).

Apart from ballet itself, another aspect that this genre expects of the dancers is to do character dance where they adapt the traditional dance from various countries like Hungary, Russia.

Related Classes: Jazz, Jazz Funk, Broadway, Tap Dance, Tango
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Hip Hop

Hip Hop Singapore Dance ClassesHip hop is possibly the most popular dance in Singapore.  Actfa has hip hop classes for all ages- kids, teens, adults and even for those who are mature or seniors.  The energetic and groovy fast-paced movements will help you get your body in better shape than before as you have fun. Britney Spears, Beyonce and Usher already took their spin on it. It's now your time to unleash your creativity into this dance!

“Hip-hop gave a generation a common ground that didn't require either race to lose anything; everyone gained.” ― Jay-Z, Decoded HipHop 

Originating in the New York City ghettos especially the Bronx in the 1970s, the hip hop dance has since taken the world by storm from the streets to the dance studios.  It is also prevalent on social media groups like YouTube and Facebook, in the movies and on TV.

African-Americans were seen dancing on the streets to vent their anger and frustration. There were mixed influences from African-American, Jamaican and Latino. Block parties often had the DJs playing popular genre of music especially funk and soul. 

Hip Hop Classes Singapore

Hip hop as a dance can be divided into 2 broad categories: old school and new school hip hop. Old school hip hop includes styles like break dancing where they are known for moves like the windmills, head spins and moonwalk. On the other hand, new school hip hop comprises of styles like krump and whacking.  

Modern day HipHop classes typically draws its inspiration from the wide variety of old and new hiphop dance moves, creating unique styles in Singapore and around the world.

The attire of most hip hop dancers is casual street wear and it has altered with growing and fading fashion trends. In general, they wear baggy shirts and pants in outstanding colours with caps. Just like in the past, where this dance can be danced on the streets, the outfit preserves the essence of the hip hop culture.

Related Classes: Kpop, Jazz Funk, Reggaeton, Pop & Lock, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Bboy/Breakdance, Parkour
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Jazz Contemporary

Jazz Contemporary Dance Class SingaporeJazz, Lyrical or Contemporary is a technique class that trains a dancer in jumps, spins, splits and balance.  One of the core technique and performance classes in Actfa Dance School Singapore, Lyrical Jazz is a hot favorite among dancers in Singapore as a dance that is emotive, classic and technical.  

Jazz & Contemporary dance combines the elegant long lines, polished spins and flexibility needed in Ballet with techniques required in modern dances.  The results: an unprecedented display of the beautiful unique characteristics of dances throughout the ages.  Students will learn & perfect a choreography over the span of 6 months in their Contemporary dance class, performing it for the examinations.

"Thousands of emotions well up inside me throughout the day. They are released when I dance." - Abraham Lincoln

Jazz is an American form of dance that originated in the early 1900 where both African and European people mixed their dance traditions.

Most of the time, dancers start off with ballet, where they learn muscle control, balance, poise and grace. Once they have mastered this discipline, they move off to pursue jazz. Jazz is a more spontaneous genre of dance which requires improvisation skills.

Jazz music is heavily syncopated and unpredictable due to the African influences. Thus, jazz dance is the same. One moment the jazz dancer may appear slow, graceful but the next moment, they execute sharp and abrupt moves and leap high into the air. To achieve all these, they have to be flexible and very attuned to the music.

In lyrical jazz classes, there is a very much fixed structure to warm up the muscles and body for the real dancing.

Firstly, a vigorous stretching regime at the start to warm-up the students’ muscles as well as prepare them for the subsequent exercises. This loosens up different parts of the body from the neck to the trunk to the legs. Practically, each muscle part that you can name of is taken care of and stretched during this period of time.

Secondly, be it a social dancer or a professional artist, the core muscles are crucial for one to hold his body upright and to be able to do physically-demanding moves. This aspect is covered when the instructor doing a series of crunches, leg-lifts, push-ups, planks that leave one very much exhausted. However, in the long run, with the gradual strengthening of these muscles, one will not be able to feel that great a strain compared to their first day doing it.

Subsequently, technical work comes in where there is a standard ankle-strengthening exercise that is done to build the dancer’s ability to stand on tip-toe. Naturally, the next set of exercises will be across the floor work that consist mainly of the different turns and spins such as pirouette and pose turns. This is often accompanied by jumps there dancers build their stamina to jump high and far.

Only then will the real jazz dancing starts where dancers do choreographies to hone their skills further and to apply what techniques they learnt into a song.
 

Korean Pop

Korean Pop Dance Classes SingaporeKorean Pop, fondly known as Kpop, is Hip Hop/ Jazz Funk danced to Korean pop songs.  This dance that took the Singapore dance industry by storm was made popular by the Korean artistes who dance and sing to their songs, these MTV dances are copied and taught in classes for those who want to learn how to dance exactly like their Kpop idols from EXO to Sistar, Big Bang to Girls Generation and more!  So learn the dances of your favourite Kpop stars. Move like them, groove like them, shake it like them! Join our class to learn the moves of your favourite Kpop girl and boy bands!  These catchy and fast-paced songs are simple to learn and fun to dance, making it a great exercise workout to do!

Related Classes: Hip Hop, Jazz Funk, Reggaeton, Pop & Lock, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Bboy/Breakdance, Parkour
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Salsa Shines

Wondering what to do when your partner break away from you? This is the class for you! Salsa Shines are the key to the next level of salsa. You will learn how to add a little more spice to your salsa moves for your routine. Shines are generally accomplished by incorporating some advanced footwork or stylish dance moves that work well with the salsa music into your pattern.

The goal of salsa shines is to shine the spotlight on one of the partners in the pair. Come on & join us in this class to discover what you can do and be in the spotlight at the dance floor!

Some videos:  Salsa ShinesBachata Shines, Salsa Shines

Related Classes: Bachata, Street Cha Cha, Zouk, Lumbia, Jazroc, Practica, Salsa, Salsa Styling, Cuban Salsa, Merengue, Casino Rueda, Afro Cuban Rumba
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Jazz Funk

Street Jazz Dance Classes SingaporeStreet Jazz, or Jazz Funk is a mix of Ballet / Lyrical Jazz & Hip Hop.  Danced to popular music and commonly seen in MTV videos, this dance is usually fast-paced and high-energy, not for the fainthearted.  It's groovy with a good mix of Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop and fun.  For those who like the smooth lines of Jazz and the funkiness of Hip Hop, this is a great dance to try out.

Related Classes: Jazz, HipHop, Reggaeton, Pop & Lock, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Bboy/Breakdance, Broadway, Cabaret, Stilettos Dance
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Pop & Lock

The Pop and Lock style of hip hop dance consists of rapid arm and leg movement and short pauses. The jerking effect in the dance is the pop and the freezes in between are the lock.

This dance is sometimes accompanied by subtle foot movements called "gliding." Someone who is gliding appears to move around the floor without using their legs.

Popping requires good rhythm. Hone your rhythm before attempting some complicated pop and lock moves.

Related Classes: Jazz, HipHop, Reggaeton, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Bboy/Breakdance, Parkour
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Tap Dance

Tap dance is a form of dance characterized by a tapping sound that is created from metal plates that are attached to both the ball and heel of the dancer's shoe. These metal plates, when tapped against a hard surface, create a percussive sound and as such the dancers are considered to be musicians.

Related Classes: Ballet, Jazz Funk, Broadway, Jazz, Tango
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Broadway

Broadway is known as a more theatrical dance form suited for stage productions, focusing on dramatic sets, costumes and showy storylines. Beginning in the streets of New York – there is literally a street named Broadway – it was made popular by world-renown musicals such as West Side Story, Grease & Chicago.

Related Classes: Ballet, Jazz Funk, Jazz, Tap Dance, Tango
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Breakdance Bboy

Breaking or b-boying, commonly called Breakdancing, is a style of dance that evolved as part of hip-hop culture among Black and Latino American youths in the South Bronx during the 1970s. The term b-boy came from the term of beat boy, because they danced to a specific beat. It is danced to both hip-hop and other genres of music that are often remixed  to prolong the musical breaks.

Related Classes: Jazz, HipHop, Kpop, Reggaeton, Pop & Lock, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Parkour
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Parkour

Parkour is a movement philosophy developed in twentieth century France. Parkour merges several disciplines. It is rumored to originate from a sport, a hobby and a philosophy. Fundamentally, parkour is where people learn to navigate obstacles with the help of public spaces. In the long run, this is applicable to their daily lives and making them more brave and confident people.

The beauty of parkour is where learners get from place to place in the most efficient way possible. Parkour teaches them to navigate physical obstacles as fast as possible during an emergency. As such, learners train their critical thinking where they consider the challenge confronting them, their physical capacity to execute the moves and the situation that presents to them.

Parkour is a non-competitive sport where learners pick up skills such as jumping and climbing or the more specific parkour moves. The objective of parkour is to get from place to place using only the human body and the objects in the environment. Parkour is often seen practiced in urban areas because of the many suitable public structures available such as buildings, walls and rails.

This sport became more popular in 1990s, when films were made about parkour. Some parkour practitioners have expressed unhappiness with the mainstreaming of the sport. Since parkour can be dangerous, an amateur may potentially hurt himself when doing parkour unsupervised. The art includes flying leaps, jumps and other physically challenging moves which can look very showy but hazardous.

Related Classes: Jazz, HipHop, Reggaeton, Kpop, Pop & Lock, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Bboy/Breakdance
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Pole Dance

Pole Dance class introduces students to the Pole and to a range of sexy movements that can be performed within given time and practice. The students will also build upper body strength and flexibility in this class which are crucial in learning to use the pole.  Classes available: Pole 1, Pole 2, Pole Grooves

Related Classes: Stilettos Dance, Exotic Dance, Belly Dance, Reggaeton, Cabaret, Kpop
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Reggaeton

Dance Classes Singapore ReggaetonIntroducing: Reggaeton dance classes A hot, sultry and energetic dance that is gaining popularity in Singapore.  With a deep and catchy beat that entices you to move your hips, this dance class is not for the fainthearted. Wanna groove to the music of Daddy Yankee, Wisin, JoLo and more? Reggaeton is famous for its strong rhythm, powerful body movements and sexy funky groove that will be the envy of others on the dance floor. Learn how to shake that booty and get down on the dance floor with us at Reggaeton / Dance Hall class!

Reggaeton developed from Jamaican and was influenced by various other musical aspects like the North American hip hop and Puerto Rican rhythms. Just like hiphop music, reggaeton appeals mainly to youths. Reggaeton is associated with the underground movement of urban youth.

Reggaeton is a dance that emphasizes on the hips. Therefore, girls are more known to do raggaeton than guys. In a dance, the girl does countless times of rotation and fast movements around the hips. Thus, during warm ups in class, you will learn control of the hips and back to emphasize your dance moves in class. Dancers in this genre of dance are usually seen with their legs slightly bent to enable easier movement of the hips. On top of that, there are movements of the chest such as chest thrust and rotation. As you can see, since reggae dance involves a lot on chest and hips isolations, it is mostly the girls who does this where they show off their curves.

Some of the well-known artists whose music is suited to dance reggaeton are Sean Paul and Daddy Yankee. Reggae music is heavily percussive with a beat called dembow that originates from Trinidad's soca music. Reggaeton music is a mix of the Jamaican dancehall rhythms which comes from reggae, latin merengue, bomba, plena and salsa.

Related Classes: Stilettos Dance, Hip Hop, Cabaret, Kpop, Brazilian Samba
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Stilettos Dance

Dance Classes Singapore StilettosWith Stilettos Dance or Heels Dance Classes, Singapore has seen a whole new generation of confident women who embrace their sensuality through dancing in heels. It is great for those who want to be more comfortable, aware and confident in their bodies and also a fun way to exercise!  Who said that powerful moves cannot be sexy and feminine? Let us redefine cultural rules for you with this dance. Challenge the boys to the dance battle of their lives, cause you're going to be stronger, sexier and completely irresistible. The ladies of Actfa Dance School Singapore will rise to the challenge: who run the world, girls?

Made popular by Hollywood stars like Carmen Electra and Pussycat Dolls, this dance allows women an avenue to explore their sexy, sensual side in an all-girls environment.  It's guaranteed to be filled with loads fun, laughter and swinging hips so come in exercise/stretchable clothes and be prepared to bring out the wild cat in you!

"Dancing in Heels should count as a Superpower." - Moly W., Hallmark
Learn to walk, strut, shake & shimmy in Stilettos class. With simple moves and a whole lot of confidence, class & attitude, join us in our weekly session to simply feel awesome as a woman.

The dance class starts with a series of warm-ups consisting of body movements, designed to help you become aware of your body and learn how to move it beautifully.  A short choreography is taught in every class; you can eventually join the steps together to a longer, complete dance.  These dance moves are suitable for clubbing, podium dancing and for the bedroom too!

Related Classes: Exotic Dance, Belly Dance, Reggaeton, Cabaret, Kpop, Pole Dance
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Belly Dance

Take up belly dance classes in Singapore now!  The exotic and sensual undulations of this middle eastern dance, coupled with the dazzling costumes makes Belly Dancean exciting class to join.  Shake and shimmy with class and style, while toning your abs, butt and hips!  Learn the sultry and sexy body movements that can help to shape your figure, and at the same time give you great moves to wow your friends or loved ones on the dance floor!

The class will start with a warm up, covering basic body isolation techniques and arm movements commonly used in Belly dance.  You will then progress to learn a simple Belly choreography, followed by a short cool down.

Related Classes: Exotic Dance, Salcaa (Body Isolation), Reggaeton, Cabaret, Kpop, Pole Dance
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Exotic Dance

Similar to Stilettos Dance, Exotic/Sensual Dance teaches a range to sexy and exotic body movements to bring out the sexy women in you.  Exotic classes are generally less danc-y and more sex-y; less flirty and more teasing...  Our range of exotic classes features lap dance, striptease and other dances with props that make your dancing fun, teasing and exciting.

Related Classes: Stilettos Dance, Belly Dance, Reggaeton, Cabaret, Kpop, Pole Dance
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Brazillian Samba

Dance Classes Singapore - Brazilian Samba with Actfa Dance School SingaporeSamba Dance Classes in Singapore - a lively, rhythmical dance of Brazilian origin in 2/4 time danced under the Samba music. However, there are three steps to every bar, making the Samba feel like a 3/4 timed dance. Its origins include the Maxixe. There are two major streams of Samba dance that differ significantly: the modern Ballroom Samba and the traditional Samba of Brazil. The Brazilian Ballroom Samba is called "Gafieira".

Brazillian Samba
The Samba music rhythm has been danced in Brazil since its inception in the late 19th century. There is actually a set of dances, rather than a single dance, that define the Samba dancing scene in Brazil; thus, no one dance can be claimed with certainty as the "original" Samba style. Another major stream of the Samba dance besides the Brazilian Samba dancing styles is Ballroom Samba which differs significantly.

Samba no pé
Samba no pé is a solo dance that is most often danced impromptu when samba music is played. The basic movement involves a straight body and a bending of one knee at a time. The feet move very slightly - only a few inches at a time. The rhythm is 2/4, with 3 steps per measure. It can be described calling it and-a-one, and-a-two, then back to one. The basic movement is the same to either side, where one foot moves to the outside lifting up just before the first beat, lifting on the "and-a" and replacing itself on the floor on the one beat (i.e. the right leg moves slightly to the right) and this leg is kept straight. The other foot moves slightly towards the front, and closer to the first foot. The second leg bends slightly at the knee so that the left side of the hip lowers and the right side appears to move higher. The weight is shifted to this inside foot briefly for the next "and-a", then shifted back to the outside foot on the "two", and the same series of actions is repeated towards the other side.
The dance simply follows the beat of the music and can go from average pace to very fast. Men dance with the whole foot on the ground while women, often wearing heels, dance just on the balls of the foot.MS O TIENE PELO HUERO COCHINO Professionals may change the steps slightly, taking 4 steps per measure instead of 3, and often add various arm movements depending on the mood of the music.
There are also regional forms of the dance in Brazil where the essential steps are the same, but because of a change in the accent of the music people will dance similar movements to the slightly changed accents. For instance, in Bahia the girls tend to dance tilting their legs towards the outside instead of keeping their knees close to each other as in Rio de Janeiro.
This is the type of Samba one sees in the Brazilian Carnival parades and in other Samba carnivals over the world.

Samba de Gafieira
Samba de Gafieira is a partner dance completely different from International Ballroom Samba. It appeared in the 40s and it gets its name from the Gafieira - popular urban nightclubs of Rio de Janeiro at that time.
The dance derived from the Maxixe and followed the arrival of the Choro (another samba musical style). It left most of the Maxixe's Polka elements behind but maintained the entwined leg movements of the Argentine Tango, although adopting a more relaxed posture than the latter. Many see this form of Samba as a combination of Waltz and Tango and several Brazilian dancing academies actually use elements and techniques of these two dances to teach Samba de Gafieira movements and choreographies.
Dynamically speaking the steps are done on a short-short-long tempo and the basic step motion goes as follows:
step - replace - forward (long)
step - replace - backwards (long)
From its inception to nowadays the Samba de Gafieira has incorporated many acrobatic movements and has evolved to become today's most complex dancing style of Samba in Brazil. This style is present in dance academies worldwide.

Samba Pagode
Samba Pagode is another Samba partner dance that resembles the Samba de Gafieira but has less acrobatic movements and tend to be more intimate. It became a dance style after the appearance of the Pagode and it started in the city of São Paulo.

Samba Axé
Samba Axé is a solo dance that started in 1992 during the Brazilian Carnival season in Bahia when the Axé rhythm replaced the Lambada. For years it became the major type of dance for the North east of Brazil during the holiday months. The dance is completely choreographed and the movements tend to mimic the lyrics. It's a very energetic kind of dance that mixes elements of Samba no pé and aerobics and because of the lyrics, which are made for entertainment, the dance generally has some sort ludic element.
Several Axé music groups such as "É o Tchan" have as part of their marketing strategy to always release a choreography together with every one of their songs; therefore, Samba Axé is an ever-changing kind of dance with no commitment to maintaining any formal set of steps or routines (there's actually no such a thing as a basic step in Samba Axé.)

Samba-rock
Samba rock is a playful form of the samba, and it originates in São Paulo. It is a Latin nightclub dance. Samba rock resembles a bit of samba de gafieira, forró, Zouk-Lambada and Salsa. It noticeably has quite a lot in common with the Cuban salsa.

Samba de roda
Performed by many capoeira groups, samba de roda is a traditional Afro-Brazilian dance that has been associated with capoeira for many years. The orchestra is composed by pandeiro (tambourine), atabaque (drum), berimbau - viola (berimbau with the smallest cabaça and the highest pitch), chocalho (rattle - a percussion instrument), accompanied by singing and clapping.

Related Classes: Exotic Dance, Belly Dance, Reggaeton, Cabaret, Kpop, Pole Dance
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Cabaret

A form of musical broadway, Cabaret as a dance style is often associated with restaurant, pub or night club dancing.  The dance style is coy, sexy and flirtatious, mixed in with a lot of theatrical drama and jazz moves to create an entertainment drama.  Popularized by movies like Moulin Rogue, Burlesque and Chicago, it is a fun and simple dance to learn, often filled with catchy music and props like feathers, fans or chairs.

Related Classes: Exotic Dance, Belly Dance, Reggaeton, Stilettos Dance, Pole Dance, Broadway, Tap
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Salcaa

Dance Classes Singapore - Salcaa Body Isolation Technique Salcaa dance class is one of the most important technique dance classes Singapore will see.  It is a dancer's conditioning class, which focuses on training body movements, spins and stretching for dancers. It is one of the most important foundation classes for all who are interested in dance.  For beginners who feel stiff and awkward while dancing, Salcaa is great as it isolates each body movement and slowly trains each body part, allowing the student to gain control and agility on their movements.  For the advanced dancer, Salcaa keeps you on your toes and in tune with your body as you can constantly push and stretch your body to it's maximum capacity in every class.  This ensures that you keep your body in tip top form and ensures that you don't loose your body control and agility.

Body Movement
Starting from the head to the toes to the whole body, the body movement section of the class tones the body while training the students to control and isolate their bodies so that they move fluidly.  Comprising of series of sharp accented moves to big undulations, students will learn and practice moving their shoulders, chest, hips, etc separately from other parts of their bodies and can eventually apply these body accents to the dance of their choice.

Spins
The spins section of the class allows students to practice their posture, spotting and balance while spinning.  These techniques practiced systematically every week allows students to become more comfortable with their balance and spotting while spinning and trains them to increase their speed.

Stretching
Flexibility in the leg and body is essential for a dancer and as we mature, we tend to loose our flexibility because we don't stretch.  The stretching segment works to maintain a dancer's basic flexibility for easy movement while dancing.

Related Classes: Salsa, Hip Hop, Belly Dance, Jazz, Yoga, Zouk, Jazz Funk, Stilettos, Exotic Dance, Reggaeton
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Yoga

Dance Classes Singapore - YogaYoga classes in Singapore - exercise and meditation for health and wholeness. Learn Yoga to strengthen and tone your body; exercise and keep your body limber; relax after a long day at work with Yoga.
 
Yoga dates back to 5000 years ago where it originates in India. In the past, yoga is practiced for good health and fitness. Today, on top of the objectives of the past, yoga is used to train body and mind control. Yoga literally means to unite; to unite the mind, spirit and body to achieve health, fitness and balance.

There are six branches of yoga.

1.Hatha Yoga or Yoga of Postures
Hatha yoga is the more popular form of yoga among people today. The word "hatha" comes from the Sanskrit terms "ha" meaning "sun" and "tha" meaning "moon". Opposites referring to the positive (sun) and the negative (moon) unites in this system of yoga.
2.Bhakti Yoga or Yoga of Devotion
In Bhakti yoga, we try to alter the condition of the mind. It is a process of mental transformation and purification. This causes us to change our character, mode of thinking, way of life, feelings, emotions and methods of communication. Only then have we perfected this form of yoga. Bhakti yoga enables us to move to another level of purity.
3.Raja Yoga or Yoga of Self-Control
Raja yoga means royal and sometimes known as the crown of Hatha yoga. This form of yoga trains our humans to become more focused after it has undergone cleansing. This trains us to remain calm and attentive.
4.Jnana Yoga or Yoga of the Mind
This form of yoga is for the purpose of self-discovery. It questions the nature of the self: Who am I? It continuously probes and fixes on being to allow us to realize or true self. This inquiry process leads us towards clear awareness and removes our attention from which we are not.
5.Karma Yoga or Yoga of Service
It is believed that your current situation is the result of your past actions. So by doing selfless service now, we are choosing a future that is devoid of negativity and selfishness. This form of yoga alters one’s attitude towards the good.
6.Tantra Yoga or Yoga of Rituals
Tantra Yogis must possess certain qualities like purity, humility, devotion, dedication to his Guru, cosmic love, and truthfulness among other things. Tantra which means "woven together" signifies the worship of the sexual union of the opposite sex. It has also come to be applied to sex-based religious practices developed in other religions, including Bon, Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism, Christianty, Judaism, and Transcendentalism.

People may think that yoga is for exercising purposes. This may be true in some sense but yoga also trains the mental and spiritual aspect of a person.

Related Classes: Pilates, Fitness Class
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Pilates

Pilates was founded by the late Joseph Pilates born in 1880 in Germany. It came about during World War (I) where he designed a series of exercises for the veterans with the aim to improve the rehabilitation.There are mainly six principles in Pilates: centering, control, flow, breath, precision and concentration. Pilates focuses on quality over quantity so instead of repeating the same move over and over again,it just requires the person to do the move with precision.

Pilates is essentially a body conditioning routine that focuses on the back, abdominal, hips, legs and arms.  It builds strength, flexibility and endurance in these areas with emphasis on the spinal and pelvic alignment.

Related Classes: Yoga, Fitness Class
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Bodyworks

Bodyworks dance classes Singapore is a very crucial dance class for those training to dance at an advanced or professional level.  Similar to a gymnastic class, Bodyworks class provides the fundamental training to strengthen the core and whole body, preparing it for headstands, handstands, cartwheels, flips, bboy freezes, etc.  Students in this class undergo weekly training to strengthen the core and overall body, while maintaining flexibility in the back and legs that are so crucial to dance.

Advanced students are encouraged to take this class on a regular basis to strengthen the body and keep it supple and fit for optimum control of the body in dancing.

Related Classes: Pilates, Fitness Class, Pole Dance, Salcaa, Jazz, Bboy, Parkour
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Fitness

The fitness session is conducted for an hour comprising of Cardio and Core workouts improving the :

Stamina of individuals.
Burning Calories naturally.
Strengthening & Toning of Core muscles.
Lean and fit program no bulks.
Conditioning of muscles.

Related Classes: Pilates, Bodyworks
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Kids Dance Classes in Singapore

Join Kids Dance Classes at great prices in Singapore: Enjoy up to 60% off for Kids Salsa, HipHop & Ballet dance classes! Dance Classes Singapore - Kids Ballet, Kids Hip Hop, Kids Salsa

Get started on our 1 year Kids & Teens Dance Program! For ages 4 to 16, sign up for our Dance Program and enjoy up to 60% discount for dance classes right now.

Dance classes are a great way for kids to learn discipline, rhythm, coordination, engage in physical activity, sweat it out and release some pent-up energy.  Our dance teachers are dedicated in sharing their passion for dance in their classes and have more than 10 years of teaching experience in Singapore and overseas. 

Choose between Ballet, HipHop & Salsa dance classes and take weekly classes at only $375 for 1 year.

Class Schedule:
Salsa Dance Class    : 7-12 yrs old Sat 2.15pm
Ballet Dance Class    : 4-10 yrs old Sun 2.15pm
HipHop Dance Class : 4-8 yrs old Sat 1.15pm
HipHop Dance Class : 7-15 yrs old Fri 7.15pm &
                                    Wed(@ Bt Merah Ctl) 7.15pm
Toddler Dance Class : 2-5 yrs old Fri 6.15pm

3 month package: kids dance classes at $125 for 13 Classes

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Kids Ballet

Dance Classes Singapore - Kids BalletKids Ballet is a foundation class that is great to train kids to get the poise, grace and lines of a dancer.  One of the most popular dance classes for kids in Singapore, Ballet is an important class to train the techniques of potential dancers in Actfa Dance School Singapore.  From the basics of Ballet, students will learn to apply these techniques to other dances, giving them the ‘feel’ and grace of a professional dancer.

Ballet goes way back to the early seventeenth century where dancers performed as a form of entertainment to a crowd during intermissions of operas. Soon ballet grew popular and had more impact on the crowd. Gradually, the ballet structure was formed defined by a style of its own.

In 1661, King Louis XIV of France founded the Académie Royale de Musique et de Danse, establishing Paris as the center of academic ballet. Over time, Russia became the international center of ballet, combining the strength and passion of Italian style with the softness and fluidity of the French school.

Today ballet is one of the top three most popular dances that people will pick up. It has a rigid syllabus for dancers to follow and get their way to the top. Ballet is divided into the grades as well as the majors. The grades are just for leisure dancers while the majors are for the more serious dancers who aspire to be instructors or professional dancers.

In ballet, there are two segments namely the barre work and the center work. The barre work is always done first as a warm up. Students will do plies and all the leg exercise to stretch and strength the leg muscles. After that shall they proceed on to the center to do short dance exercises. In the more advanced level, the duration of these pieces get longer as more techniques are being added to one piece of music.

Furthermore, when girls proceed on to the majors, they will be dancing on pointe. Special pointe shoes are worn so the girls can dance on their toes. For guys, they still remain in their soft shoes but they have to do more technical stuff compared to girls (e.g. jump higher, spin greater number of rounds).

Apart from ballet itself, another aspect that this genre expects of the dancers is to do character dance where they adapt the traditional dance from various countries like Hungary, Russia.

Related Classes: Kids HipHop, Kids Salsa, Ballet, Jazz
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Kids Hip Hop

Dance Classes Singapore - Kids Hip HopHip Hop dance classes Singapore - a great way for your child to learn coordination, movement skills, teamwork and explore how to move their bodies to music!  Join Actfa Dance School Singapore in our Kids Hip Hop classes once a week for some physical exercise and introduce your child to a world of music and dance.

Hip Hop originated in the New York City ghettos especially the Bronx in the 1970s. African-Americans are seen dancing on the streets to vent their anger and frustration. There were mixed influences from African-American, Jamaican and Latino. Block parties often had the DJs playing popular genre of music especially funk and soul.

In hip hop, it is divided into old school and new school hip hop. Old school hip hop includes styles like break dancing where they are known for moves like the windmills, head spins and moonwalk. On the other hand, new school hip hop comprise styles like krump and whacking.

Hip hop is an individual dance that is rather versatile. People usually fuse hip hop with other genres like jazz and salsa into choreographies. The mainstream music caters to most of the hip hop dancers with songs from popular artists like Beyonce, Pitbull and Ying Yang Twins.

The attire of most hip hop dancers is casual street wear. They wear baggy shirts and pants in outstanding colours with caps. Just like in the past, where this dance can be danced on the streets, the outfit preserves the essense of the hip hop culture.

Hip hop is a gobal and widespread where each country her own style. In Korea, girl and boy bands are known to dance MTV hip hop while in The Philippines, most of the people dance to krump. In Singapore, the hip hop scene is growing at a rather significant rate and one obvious sign is the hip hop team ‘Joyce and the Boys’ who clinched third place in the World Hip Hop Competition in year 2009.

Related Classes: Kids Ballet, Kids Salsa, Hip Hop, Jazz Funk, Pop & Lock
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Kids Salsa

Dance Classes Singapore - Kids SalsaJoin us at Actfa Dance School Singapore to learn Kids Salsa.  The dance classes Singapore mummies and daddies know is usually limited to Ballet, Hip Hop and Latin dance.  Salsa gives children the opportunity to build their character and nurture their love for latin music and latin dance.  It's fun, flirty and energetic and the music calls your feet to move!

Salsa: mention the word in any part of the world and people will know what you’re talking about. Its fun, enthusiastic and entertaining, and its hot spicy rhythm forces hips to sway to the beat. It is one of the most dynamic musical styles of the Western World and is gaining popularity rapidly in Asia.

Salsa is a dance style associated with the salsa style of music now popular worldwide.  It's all about rhythm. For Cubans especially, music and dance has always had a very special place in society. Salsa music which is the "essential pulse of Latin music" is primarily played in Latin Dance Clubs. While not the easiest dance form, because of its fast tempo, it is not particularly difficult, and dancers of all skill levels should be able to gain proficiency within a matter of months. Salsa is usually danced with a partner and can be flirtatious in a fun way and sensuous in another. However, dancers may integrate solo breaks known as shines into their routines. Shines involve lots of flamboyant movements and demonstrations of the body, and are intended as a way for a dancer to show off their full talent. While shines are in theory improvisational, there are many standard shines which dancers learn and can fall back on.

There are 3 different types of Salsa: the LA style Salsa On 1; New York style Salsa On 2 otherwise known as Mambo; and finally the Cuban style Salsa. All 3 types of Salsa have a pattern of six steps danced over eight counts of music. The LA and New York style Salsa are usually danced in a linear motion. Cuban Salsa on the other hand tends to go in a circular motion at all angles.

LA Style Salsa On 1
L.A. style is danced on 1 which literally means to dance on the first beat of the phrase, therefore gaining the name as "On 1". It is highly influenced by Hollywood showing many similarities with the lindy-hop, the swing and the hustle. In Salsa On 1, turns have become an important feature and also emphasizes theatricality and acrobatics.

New York Style Salsa On 2
Unlike LA style, New York style is danced on 2 which literally means to dance on the second beat of the phrase, hence taking on the name - "On 2". Many also refer to this style as "Mambo". On 2 timing emphasises the conga drum's tumbao pattern, and encourages the dancer to listen to percussive elements of the music.

Cuban Style Salsa
Cuban-style salsa can be danced either on the down beat ("a tiempo") or the upbeat ("a contratiempo"). Beats 1,3,5 and 7 are downbeats and 2,4,6 and 8 are upbeats. The Cuban Salsa is more commonly danced in groups of couples, with frequent exchanges of partner in which the style is that in many patterns, the leader and follower circle around each other and the patterns are synchronised by a caller. This form is also known as Rueda de Casino.

DID YOU KNOW?
Salsa means sauce in the Spanish Language, and carries connotations of the spiciness common in Latin and Caribbean cuisine. Salsa also suggests a "mixture" of ingredients, though this meaning is not found in most stories of the term's origin.

Related Classes: Kids HipHop, Kids Ballet, Salsa, Salsa Shines, Salsa Styling
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Kids Salcaa

Salcaa is a dancer's conditioning class, which focuses on training body movements, spins and stretching for dancers. It is one of the most important foundation classes for all who are interested in dance.  For beginners who feel stiff and awkward while dancing, Salcaa is great as it isolates each body movement and slowly trains each body part, allowing the student to gain control and agility on their movements.  For the advanced dancer, Salcaa keeps you on your toes and in tune with your body as you can constantly push and stretch your body to it's maximum capacity in every class.  This ensures that you keep your body in tip top form and ensures that you don't loose your body control and agility.

Body Movement
Starting from the head to the toes to the whole body, the body movement section of the class tones the body while training the students to control and isolate their bodies so that they move fluidly.  Comprising of series of sharp accented moves to big undulations, students will learn and practice moving their shoulders, chest, hips, etc separately from other parts of their bodies and can eventually apply these body accents to the dance of their choice.

Spins
The spins section of the class allows students to practice their posture, spotting and balance while spinning.  These techniques practiced systematically every week allows students to become more comfortable with their balance and spotting while spinning and trains them to increase their speed.

Stretching
Flexibility in the leg and body is essential for a dancer and as we mature, we tend to loose our flexibility because we don't stretch.  The stretching segment works to maintain a dancer's basic flexibility for easy movement while dancing.

Related Classes: Kids HipHop, Kids Salsa, Jazz Funk, Belly dance
See All Kids & Teens Classes . See All Dance Classes . See Dance Classes by Price

Modeling

Basic modeling for aspiring models.  Learn runway walks, posing for photoshoots and best angles for photography.

Acting

Are you interested in actign & drama?  Do you want to learn acting for television, drama, film & theatre?  Learn basic acting skills from using different techniques.  Join now!

Singing

singingLearn techniques to sing - expand your range, learn how to sing like your favourite idol, check out the different styles that you can sing - in our voice class!
Just like dancing, singing comprises of muscles that you have to learn to control, and practice will make it easier to do so!  Join our weekly classes to hone those muscles to give you the control to sing better and express your soul through your voice freely!

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Testimonials

Starlinn Actfa DanceSTARLINN CHOO YANQING joined the SFDF program in 2004 while studying in NUS, training 12 hours a day; she completed her SFDF, Diploma & IHDC courses in 3 years, using her teaching income to finance her classes in Diploma & IHDC. In 2008 she pursued her IMDC Dance Business & is now doing her 3 years IPHDC Dance Product Research. While pursuing her IHDC she was already traveling around the world for assignments. more


Bianca Actfa DanceBIANCA enrolled in the SFDF course after A-levels. Within 6 months she was dancing as a backup dancer for MTV. She has also traveled to many countries like Germany, UK, Taiwan & Hong Kong to teach & perform, & was offered a position to dance in a few Musical plays. 


 Libin Actfa DanceLB, a masters degree holder working for a MNC, decided to do a career switch after he completed his SFDF. He then worked as an International Sales Manager in dance products, an international artist & dance instructor. He is the Singapore Bachata Champion 2008 and the 1st runner up in the Asia Salsa Championship behind Serge and Polina from Russia in 2010. more


manfred Actfa DanceMANGGOH was one of the elite few selected for the Mediacorp Dance Academy in 2000. He graduated from NTU with a degree in Mechanical Engineering and used to work as a Project Manager in the IT Industry. He passed his examination & evaluation for SFDF and is currently doing his Diploma & IHDC. more


maricel Actfa DanceMARICEL, a professional dancer from the Philippines, joined SFDF in 2009. In less than a year, she has performed at the Esplanade Da:ns Festival 2009, Salsa Cruise Asia 2009, & has also been to China to teach & perform. In 2010 she was offered a full time dance instructor job in Singapore. She has since gone on to set up a dance studio in the Philippines and comes back periodically to upgrade her skills.


rachel Actfa DanceRACHEL an undergraduate in NTU joined the SFDF in 2010 and was offered to open a dance studio in China.  She has taught and performed in Guang Zhou, Shen Zhen, Hong Kong, Singapore.


 derrick actfa danceDERRICK has over 20 years of dance instructor experience with more than 30 types of dance. He was granted an exemption from SFDF after taking an examination & evaluation and signed up for the diploma & IHDC simultaneously.


tamil actfa danceTAMIL, a professional dancer & teacher actively involved in competitions & performances for Hip Hop, Bollywood, Indian Dance. He was teaching dance in secondary school and choreographing for SYF. He joined the IHDC program to further his training as a dancer & teacher in 2009.  Since joining the IHDC, he has taught, performed & competed in Hong Kong, China, Taiwan.


brenda actfa danceBRENDA joined the SFDF when she was 13 years old and was hired to teach and perform both locally and overseas after 6 months. She was also financing her own dance study while teaching private dance classes.  Under the SFDF, she was the 1st runner up in the Asia Salsa Championship 2010 and Singapore Bachata Champion 2009.  She was given opportunities to teach in Malaysia, Hong Kong, China.

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Actfa School of Dance & Performing Arts
Tel:  +65 6225 0150                        Location:  Map
Email:  i@actfa.com                      Inquiries:  Ask Us
47A Chander Road, Singapore 219546
(3min from Little India MRT, exit E
Parking at Grand Imperial Hotel)